Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Hope Santa Brings

For the Broke and the Bookish’s Top Ten Tuesday:

December 19: Top Ten Books I Hope Santa Brings

Narrowing it down to only ten is the hardest part here! I also tried to go with at least a few books that I really want but might not think to buy for myself. Though obviously since I put them on this list, I did think of it!

51zhmf9kdil-_ac_us218_1. Take Courage: Anne Bronte and the Art of Life by Samantha Ellis- I’ve been a fan of Samantha Ellis ever since I read her memoir How To Be A Heroine. I’ve always been a big fan of Anne Bronte, who is very much the overlooked Bronte sister. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall and Agnes Grey deserve a place on the shelf alongside Jane Eyre, Villette, and Wuthering Heights. She was as talented as Charlotte and Emily, but her work hasn’t been adapted to the same extent. It’s not written about as much.  Considering the fact that the Bronte’s are a family about whom a lot has been written, it’s strange that so little has been said about Anne. I look forward to learning more about her and her work.

41oky5u1zsl-_ac_us160_2. Rereadings: Seventeen writers revisit books they love by Anne Fadiman (ed)- I’m always intrigued by the idea of rereading things. Part of it is due to my own conflict: there are so many books that I want to revisit, now that I have more experience in life/ a different perspective. But there are also so many books that I haven’t read yet! Which is more worthy of my time? It’s an eternal question. In this book, Anne Fadiman collects essays from seventeen writers about the books that they return to. over and over again. Maybe it will inspire me to reread some old favorites.

41nrqvn9zxl-_ac_us218_3. Hat Box: The Collected Lyrics of Stephen Sondheim by Stephen Sondheim- Most people know that I am a huge musical theatre geek. Huge. There is no one I have higher respect for than Stephen Sondheim, who has give the American musical so much. He’s the recipient of eight Tony Awards, eight Grammys, an Academy Award for Best Original Song (“Sooner or Later” from Dick Tracy) and a Pulitzer Prize for Drama (for Sunday in the Park With George) and a Presidential Medal of Freedom. At 87 years old, he is currently working on his next project! This box sets features Sondheim’s two volumes of his collected lyrics; Finishing the Hat and Look I Made A Hat (both titles refer to the lyrics of “Finishing the Hat” from Sunday in the Park With George). The lyrics in these books are like really clever poetry. Listening closely to a Sondheim lyric you’ll find internal rhyme, double (and triple) entendres, and complex word play. Not only do these volumes give the full libretto of Sondheim’s musicals, they also include anecdotes, reproductions from his notebooks with corrections and revisions, alternate/cut songs that didn’t make it into the final version of the show, as well as observations, and recollections.

61jbrrzbrel-_ac_us218_4. The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter by Theodora Goss- Theodora Goss is one of the unsung greats of today as far as I’m concerned. She’s a novelist, short story writer, essayist,  poet, and teacher. Her latest is a mash up of female characters from 19th century literature. The orphaned Mary Jekyll is curious about her father’s past. She comes across a clue that points her in the direction of Edward Hyde, her father’s former friend. The hunt for Hyde leads her to his daughter, Diana. Through her search, Mary comes into contact with a number of women, who were all created via scientific experimentation: Beatrice Rappaccini, Catherin Moreau, and Justine Frankenstein. Oh and if that wasn’t enough fun, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are also there.

51oi-wfd4bl-_ac_us218_5. Rejected Princesses: Tales of History’s Boldest Heroines, Hellions and Heretics by Jason Porath-  This is for everyone who is sick of Disney’s princesses!  This book, inspired by the blog of the same name features women for myth to history and back again, who broke the rules, and were a little to fierce to make the cut for animated children’s movies.  It even features illustrations in a contemporary animation style, and turns the pretty pink princess stereotype upside down.

5111djnwwwl-_ac_us218_6. Introducing the Honourable Phryne Fisher by Kerry Greenwood- One of my “discoveries” of 2017 was the wonderful Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries (murder is always more palatable when it takes place in a period setting!)  . Set in Australia in the 1920’s, Phryne Fisher leaves high society for life as a private detective. She handles everything from kidnapping to murder with style and flair. The series is based on novels by Kerry Greenwood, none of which I’ve read yet.  This volume contains the first three novels, so it seems like a good start for the series.

41a3p6ukcfl-_ac_us218_7. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King-  This past year I read one of the writing books that had been recommended to me many times; Bird by Bird. For some reason I resisted reading it, but it was very much worth the read. So now I’m thinking it’s time to explore the other writing book that can be described in much the same way. It’s been recommended many times and I’ve resisted reading it. When I think about it though it seems pretty silly. Stephen King has his strengths and weaknesses but it’s hard to deny that he’s one of our most prolific and popular writers. I’m certainly interested in his memoirs of his craft.

41xqczfdy8l-_ac_us218_8. The Blythes Are Quoted by LM Montgomery- This book was intended to by LM Mongomery’s 9th book in her Anne series. It was delivered to her publisher on the day she died and has never been published in its entirety before. It’s been heavily abridged and published as The Road to Yesterday. This is supposedly Montgomery’s most experimental work. It’s divided into two sections; one taking place before WWI and one after. It features 15 short stories that are interspersed with “sketches” featuring Anne and Gilbert discussing poems that Anne wrote with their son, Walter. In this way she fuses prose, poetry, and dialogue.  I’ve always loved the Anne series and have always felt like Rilla of Ingleside was an odd place to leave the family. So It’s nice to know there was intended to be something that comes after.

51kdw4g8bl-_ac_us218_9. Women Who Run with the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype by Clarissa Pinkola Estes-  This has been on my TBR for a long time, and I haven’t gotten around to it yet. I figure that having it staring at me on my shelf might help me get to reading it. In the book the author, a Jungian analyst, calls on fairy tales, folklore, and dream symbols to restore women’s instinctive and intuitive abilities. It looks at the Wild Woman archetype of a woman in touch with her instincts via tales from all over the world. I suppose the topic interests me, and I’d like to get around to it at some point.

61anunqkwbl-_ac_us218_10. Humans of New York by Brandon Stanton– Like many, I’m addicted to Humans of New York, a blog that talks to *wait for it* humans in New York. It features pictures that for the most part look like people you’d see on the street and not really give all that much thought to. But alongside the pictures are quotes and stories from the person’s life. It’s wonderful to see how everyone we see, even those we don’t register is a whole story. Some are sweet, some sad,  and some funny.  But it’s a reminder that we’re all stories in progress.

 

4 thoughts on “Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Hope Santa Brings

  1. This is such a cool and interesting list! I love how you put books you might not think to buy for yourself on here too. I really like the sound of Rereadings, because I used to love rereading things, but do it so much less now. I think the Sondheim book is something I’ll have to look into for my sister at some point cos that’s more her area of expertise 😉 I am really curious about the Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter. Women Who Run With Wolves certainly sounds interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Take Courage almost made my wish list this year too. I absolutely loved Samantha Ellis’ How to be a Heroine and am always here for anything that champions Anne Bronte. I can’t wait to hear your thoughts on this one, as well as the Phyrne Fisher books. I’m completely obsessed with Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries, but I’m not sure if I would enjoy the books nearly as much. Hope you had a very merry and bookish Christmas, Fran!

    Liked by 1 person

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