Top Ten Tuesday: Best Character Names

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

May 22: Best Character Names (make this as narrow/broad as you’d like)

51k3i-j1fl-_ac_us218_1. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte– I don’t know which came first, the character or the expression “plain Jane.” But either way, they’re sort of inseparable. Plus, the Eyre sounds like “air” or “heir.” Which is consistent with both the bird imagery used by the character and what we later learn about her.

 

 

51hmsqsiztl-_ac_us218_2. Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren– Actually that’s Pippilotta Delicatessa Windowshade Mackrelmint Ephraim’s Daughter Longstocking. Not every character can pull off a name like that.

 

 

 

51vxh2jgv8l-_ac_us218_3. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell– Apparently in early drafts of the novel, Mitchell referred to her heroine as “Pansy.” All I can say is thank goodness for whoever made her change it! “Scarlett” is perfect for a character who causes tongues to wag wherever she goes.

 

 

51f6ex2-vul-_ac_us218_4. Precious Bane by Mary WebbPrudence Sarn is a great name for the heroine of this novel. Like the character, it’s strong and practical rather than delicate and pretty.

 

 

 

51hrmnxgool-_ac_us218_5. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray– Like her name, Becky Sharp is a teensy bit of cuteness surrounded by harsh edges that might cut you, if you’re not careful. Becky, of course, short for Rebecca, which means “captivating” which describes the character well. But beware of being too captivated…

 

 

 

41xt3sg-yl-_ac_us218_6. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle– The “Sh” in the beginning makes it sound like a secret. It also indicated someone asking for quiet to allow for thought. And the “lock” suggests something hidden or locked away. Overall a perfect name for a detective.

 

 

51tt9v9vjl-_ac_us218_7. Wuthering Heights by Emily BronteHeathcliff is a great name for the anti-hero-yet-somehow-not-quite-villain of this book. Dictionary.com defines a heath as “a tract of open and uncultivated land; wasteland overgrown with shrubs.” As a foundling, who was largely neglected following his adoption, Heathcliff can certainly be described as “uncultivated.” The addition of the “cliff” at the end of the name suggests danger. It’s consistent with a character who is untamed, vengeful, and unforgiving. 

417ccdcfnel-_ac_us218_8. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde- Etymologically, the name Dorian is linked to  “gold” or “golden” (think El Dorado”) which is consistent with the character’s appearance. But the “Gray” implies some kind of ambiguity, a suggestion that Dorian isn’t as perfect as his initial appearance suggests.

 

 

41gwjpjhljl-_ac_us218_9. Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy- Gabriel Oak is a fitting name for the hero of this novel. “Gabriel” comes from the Hebrew meaning “God is my strength” and “Oak” of course suggests a very strong tree. Gabriel Oak is the loyal, steady, moral center of the novel. He draws strength of character, and integrity from the hardships that he endures.

 

51ycpilxgcl-_ac_us218_10. A Chrismas Carol by Charles Dickens- Ebenezer Scrooge‘s very name suggests his most notable character trait. The “nezer” hints at the word “miser” without being too on the nose. The last name also suggests “screw” as in he screws people over. I doubt that was intentional on Dickens’ part since I don’t know if the word screw was used in that way when the book was written, but it’s a nice touch now.

14 thoughts on “Top Ten Tuesday: Best Character Names

  1. Fran, before I went for my Harry Potter theme, I was also thinking of the brilliant Sherlock Holmes and Ebenezer Scrooge and while not Gabriel I was thinking of Bathsheba Everdene from Far From the Madding Crowd 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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