Top Ten Tuesday: TV Shows Based on Books

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

September 4: Bingeworthy TV Shows/Amazing Movies (The new fall TV season is starting up this month, so let’s talk about what shows everyone should watch when they’re not reading!)

I decided to look at TV series based on books. But I set myself some rules for this list. I have to have seen the TV series and read the book. The TV series also had to be something that ran continuously for at least a full reason, rather than a simple 2-3 part miniseries.

1. Big Little Lies- The big change here was moving the setting of the story from Australia (in the book)  to California. Originally this was intended to be one season, but then it was renewed for a second season. I don’t know what they’re going to do with the second season though, because the first season was based on the book. The book has no sequel.

2. Pillars of the Earth– This novel was initially adapted as an eight-episode miniseries. Then the sequel, World Without End, was given a miniseries as well. Now that there’s a third book, A Column of Fire, let’s see if Starz continues doing adaptations. It’s worth noting that each book is set a few hundred years apart, but all deal with events in and around Kingsbridge cathedral.

3. Outlander– This adaptation of Diana Gabaldon’s series seems to be sticking to a 1 season to 1 book model, with the first three seasons of the show corresponding to the first three books in the series. There are changes for the screen of course, but the overall story that the TV series seems to be telling still seems in line with what the books are doing. More often than not the changes are for the sake of simplicity.

4. Alias Grace– This Netflix miniseries adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel of the same name is pretty faithful. It’s six episodes long, and doesn’t seem to aspire to renewal, which makes sense because the novel comes to a definite conclusion. What I appreciated about the adaptation here was the fact that it maintained the same ambiguity that the novel did. Things aren’t clearly laid out, but rather are left open to interpretation.

5. Anne of Green Gables– Anne has been given a wonderful miniseries adaptation that I discuss a bit here. But that doesn’t apply because according to my self-imposed rules I can’t choose anything that has only 2 or 3 parts. However, Netflix’s Anne with An E applies. It makes some interesting creative choices and significantly diverts from the cannon toward the end of the first season. I haven’t seen the second season yet for that reason.  I need to be in the right mood to be willing to accept those divergences.

6. Sharp Objects– I’m still in the process of watching this miniseries based on the novel by Gillian Flynn, so if there are any significant changes in later episodes, don’t tell me! So far it seems like they’re sticking fairly close to the book though.

7. Dexter– The first season of this show stays pretty close to Jeff Lindsay’s first novel in the book series that inspired it. The second season diverts so that while the premise is the same (sympathetic serial killer works with the cops by day, takes out bad guys by night, and tries to balance his “normal” life with it all) but not much else is. Though I’ve only read the first two books of the series so perhaps there are returns later on. Also a note, that in the last few seasons the show takes a major downturn.

8. The Lynley and Havers series– The TV show for some reason focuses more on Inspector Lynley than Havers (who is far more attractive and far less interesting in her TV incarnation than in the books) but otherwise, the first few seasons of this show are fairly in line with the source material by Elizabeth George.

9. Bleak House– This is an eight-hour miniseries that was aired in the UK in 30-minute segments. In the US it aired in six installments the first and last being two hours long and the rest was one hour. It was later rebroadcast in four two hour segments. The series was shot and was designed to air in a soap opera format. The logic of using this format was the Dickens wrote popular, long, serialized narratives much like soap operas. It’s true that the novel was originally released in monthly installments, ending with cliffhangers. Regardless of the intention, this miniseries does its source material proud.

10. The White Queen is a 10 episode adaptation of the first three novels in Phillippa Gregory’s Cousin’s War series (The White Queen, The Red Queen, The Kingmaker’s Daughter).  The White Princess is an eight-episode follow up that adapts the later two novels in the series; the titular novel and The King’s Curse. Starz has announced that it will make a third entry in the series called The Spanish Princess that will adapt parts of The King’s Curse not depicted in The White Princess, as well as the novel The Constant Princess. Of course, when multiple novels are being adapted like this, there’s considerable streamlining!

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2 thoughts on “Top Ten Tuesday: TV Shows Based on Books

  1. Excellent list! I’ve watched and enjoyed: Big Little Lies, Sharp Objects, Bleak House, and The White Queen but haven’t read the books; and I’ve read Alias Grace and Anne of Green Gables but haven’t seen these adaptations. Outlander and The Pillars of the Earth are the only ones Ive read and watched.

    Like you, I’m curious to see what they have planned for season two of Big Little Lies. I loved the first season snd thought it was wrapped up perfectly. I’ll certainly watch it, but I”m a bit skeptical about the need for another one. I’m also not sure if I can enjoy Anne of GG without comparing it to the previous miniseries nonstop.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m hoping that the second season of Big Little Lies is able to keep up the quality of the first one. It has compelling characters and a strong cast.

      I found the divergences from the book to be more of a distraction in Anne with an E. I think even if I hadn’t read the book like ten times I would notice when certain elements were introduced for the sake of melodrama or “grit”!

      Liked by 1 person

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