Top Ten Tuesday: Anticipated Released for Early 2019

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

ttt-new

January 8: Most Anticipated Releases for the First Half of 2019

511V7J75KsL._AC_US218_1.  The Witches are Coming by Lindy West– This book looks at how our current socio-political moment has been stoked by a steady diet of pop culture created by mediocre white men.

 

 

 

2. 51SnHkgfUEL._AC_US218_ Daughter of Moloka’i by Alan Brennert– I loved Brennert’s Moloka’i and I’m hoping that this lives up to that standard.

 

 

 

41q9vrZpraL._AC_US218_3. The Woman in the Lake by Nicola Cornick- In this case the comparisons to Kate Morton, Barbara Erskine and Susanna Kearsley got my attention pretty quickly!

 

 

 

 

51sOOMroi9L._AC_US218_4. The Familiars by Stacey Halls– This is historical fiction set against the backdrop of the Pendle Hill witch trials. It looks interesting!

 

 

 

515y9hgrwzl-_ac_us218_5. The Paragon Hotel by Lyndsay Faye– I loved Faye’s Jane Steele and I’m currently reading (and enjoying) her first novel, Dust and Shadow. Her latest has been getting some good advance reviews, so I’m excited.

 

 

 

41qPb6ELO-L._AC_US218_6. Normal People by Sally Rooney– I think that this book has already been released some places, but here the release date is listed as April 2019. Regardless, it sounds good!

 

 

 

31ieCRhGhEL._AC_US218_7. Machines Like Me by Ian McEwan– Sometimes when McEwan gets weird it doesn’t quite work for me (Nutshell, I’m looking at you!) but this novel about artificial intelligence set in a alternative version of London in the 1980’s sounds interesting.

 

 

41etjy5BOOL._AC_US218_8. Spring by Ali Smith– I’m a little behind on Smith’s four seasons quartet (I still haven’t read Winter!) but  I still plan to read that and this one ASAP.

Advertisement

Top Ten Tuesday: Winter 2018-2019 TBR

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

ttt-new

December 18: Winter 2018-2019 TBR

This week it’s just the top eight:

513xypka1bl-_ac_us218_1. Once Upon A River by Diane Setterfield- I loved Setterfield’s debut novel The Thirteenth Tale. I was disappointed in her sophomore effort, Bellman and Black, but I’ve heard good things about this one, so fingers crossed!

 

 

515y9hgrwzl-_ac_us218_2. The Paragon Hotel by Lyndsay Faye– I loved Faye’s Jane Steele. Her follow up, a historical mystery set amidst racial tensions in the 1920’s sounds really compelling.

 

 

 

41narWytvkL._AC_US218_3. I Owe You One by Sophie Kinsella– Sophie Kinsella is pretty reliable for a fluffy read to distract you from reality. And sometimes that’s very necessary so I’m glad that she has a new one out!

 

 

 

51sOOMroi9L._AC_US218_4. The Familiars by Stacy Halls– This sounds like a compelling historical mystery set against the backdrop of the Pendle Hill Witch Trials of 1612.

 

 

 

51HxcBeCBKL._AC_US218_5. Girls with Sharp Sticks by Suzanne Young– The blurb for this describes it as Westworld meets The Handmaid’s Tale. I found that description compelling enough to make me curious.

 

 

 

41q9vrZpraL._AC_US218_6. Woman in the Lake by Nicola Cornick- This historical novel was compared to the work of  Kate Morton, Philippa Gregory and Barbara Erskine. That’s enough to catch my interest!

 

 

 

51SnHkgfUEL._AC_US218_7. The Daughter of Moloka’i by Alan Brennert- I really liked Brennert’s Moloka’i and I’m intrigued by a follow up. Hopefully it’ll be a worthy successor rather than a rehash.

 

 

 

41eOX0cBT8L._AC_US218_8. Milkman by Anna Burns– This one recently won the Man Booker Prize and has been getting a lot of attention and it sounds interesting.

 

 

 

 

What recent or future releases do you plan to read this winter?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Hidden Gems

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

September 11: Hidden Gems (which books haven’t been talked about as much or haven’t been marketed as strongly that you think deserve some recognition?)

51rkzkhzekl-_ac_us218_1. A Kiss Before Dying by Ira Levin– Our narrator is an intelligent, good-looking young college student. He’s dating Dorothy, a wealthy young woman with a problem. She’s pregnant. If/when her dad finds out about the baby, he’ll cut her off penniless. Thereby eliminating any use she might be of to our narrator. But that’s easily solved. He can get rid of Dorothy and try to marry money again in a year or two. She’s got two sisters after all! We spend the first portion of the book seeing through the eyes of a sociopath, and the latter portion we see from the perspective of his potential victims. I’m usually pretty good at spotting an author’s tricks. About 2/3 of the way through I was sure that I knew exactly where this was going and I was totally wrong! Ira Levin is well known for some of his other books like Rosemary’s Baby and The Stepford Wives. This is his debut and it definitely teases his future ability as a storyteller.

31vqaqjxh5l-_ac_us218_2. Passion by IU Tarchetti– This was made into a film called Passione D’amore in 1981 and was adapted as a Tony-winning musical in 1995, but it’s still not very well known. Giorgio is a young soldier, having an affair with Clara, a slightly older, slightly married, woman. When he’s transferred to a provincial military outpost, he meets Colonel Ricci, his new commanding officer. The Colonel lives with his sick cousin Fosca. When the Colonel mentions that Fosca is an avid reader, Giorgio lends her some books. But when he meets Fosca he’s taken aback by her illness, her ugliness, and her lack of polite social skills. Still, he tries to be kind to her when their paths cross. As Fosca falls for Giorgio, she makes no effort to hide her feelings. And when she finds out about Clara she makes her opinion known. The strength of her overtures deeply unsettles Giogio who is thrown into the depths of emotions, love as well as hate, with an intensity that he’s never before experienced. I think one reason this doesn’t have mainstream popularity is that the reader doesn’t have an obvious person to root for. Giorgio is a perfectly nice guy, but he’s most comfortable on surfaces. He’s all for polite chatter and interactions. Fosca forces him beyond that, pushing him (and the reader) into uncomfortable territory. Yet that’s also the reason that it’s hard for a reader to identify with Fosca. She makes Giorgio, and us, uncomfortable.

51tsapquwul-_ac_us218_3. Madensky Square by Eva Ibbotson– Susanna is a dressmaker in Vienna circa 1911. She watches over her neighbors and keeps a journal. We meet the people in her life. There’s Herr Egger, a fellow with a nasty habit. Nini is Susannah’s dress model, who moonlight’s as an anarchist. Then there are the Schumakers and their six daughters, Sigi the piano prodigy next door, Susannah’s lover, an aristocratic field marshall, and her friend Alice, the only person who knows that Susannah has secrets of her own… Eva Ibbotson is best known for her middle-grade fantasy and YA romance novels, which are lovely. While this has romantic elements it’s more a slice of life than her other work and seems aimed at a slightly older readership. I wish that Ibbotson wrote more for this audience.

5196005bwql-_ac_us218_4. Watch By Moonlight by Kate Hawks- Many of us have read Alfred Noyes’ poem “The Highwayman,” in which an innkeepers daughter “had watched for her love in the moonlight.” The poem is notable for its strong rhythm and vivid narrative. In this book, Hawks expands and retells the poem’s narrative. We meet Bess Whateley, who works in her parents’ public house, and falls in love with Jason Quick, a thief who steals to buy his father out of indentured servitude. He is now pursued by the King’s 54th Regiment. In the poem, the title character is presented as a romantic hero. He is here too, but as we learn about his character and his background we see him become more three dimensional. Is he romantic? Yes. but he’s also a criminal. He’s doing bad things for a good reason, which makes him very human and flawed. If you’re not familiar with the poem I’d suggest going into the story fresh. Hawks includes bits and pieces throughout the novel, and it’s included in its entirety at the end. I knew the poem, so the ending took on an inevitability for me as I read the book.

51zjlwr-kl-_ac_us218_5. Time and Chance by Alan Brennert– One night, Richard Cochrane, an actor, flubs his lines during a production of Brigadoon. Following the performance, he learns that his mother died, and he goes back to his New Hampshire town.  Going home has made him reflective. He thinks about the decisions he made, and what he gave up to pursue his acting career.  Thirteen years ago, Richard broke up with his girlfriend and left town in pursuit of his dreams. But now that he’s back, Richard encounters the man he might have been: the Richard who put aside his dreams of an acting career, got a steady job at an insurance company, married his girlfriend and had a family. Both Richards are unhappy and on some level both regret the choices that brought them to this point. So they decide to switch places so each can see if he’s happier if he’d decided differently. Yes, this is a fantasy, in which a man meets a parallel version of himself, but I think most people can relate to in some way. We all have decision points in our lives that leave us wondering “what might have been” if we’d chosen a different path.

51boj2l7mll-_ac_us218_6. The Ear, The Eye and the Arm by Nancy Farmer– Zimbabwe, 2174. General Amadeus Marsika’s three children disappear from their yard one day. They quickly learn that their world is one of contrasts. Wealthy people, like their family, live in vast estates staffed by robots. The poor live in a neighborhood called The Cow’s Guts where they search for plastic in a toxic waste dump. Here, the Marsika children are taken, prisoner. They escape only to encounter new dangers. Meanwhile, they are pursued by three very unusual detectives, knowns as The Ear, The Eye, and The Arm, who seem to always be a few moments too late to rescue the kids. This stands apart from so many other YA dystopias with its blend of high tech futuristic setting and African tribal folklore. While there are parallels to other fantasy tales, such as The Wizard of Oz, this has enough to make it unique and provocative.

21mg6dwqdwl-_ac_us218_7. Lionors: King Arthur’s Uncrowned Queen by Barbara Ferry Johnson- Keep in mind, I read this as a teen and loved it, I but I haven’t read it since. I don’t know how well it holds up.  Lionors is mentioned in several literary sources as King Arthur’s mistress and the mother of his illegitimate son, but in this book, she takes center stage. Lionors, daughter of the Earl of Santam, meets Arthur, the ward of Sir Ecktor. They fall in love and plan to marry. But when it turns out that Arthur is actually the son of Uther Pendragon, and is now King, it becomes clear that he must marry elsewhere to secure the peace of the kingdom. However, he returns to Lionors whenever he can. She hears about what’s going on in Camelot, but her life is at her manor. The book is managing something tricky. The narrator is removed from the action for the most part, but she has stakes in it nonetheless. Aside from her visits from Arthur, and the child she has with him (here it’s a daughter), Lionors is connected to the events of Camelot via visitors for the most part and she struggles to have a purpose beyond the fulfillment of an ancient prophecy: “You will be a queen, but you will die uncrowned and unknown…”

61nsx83i0fl-_ac_us218_8. Biting the Sun by Tanith Lee- In 4B there are no limits to pleasure. People are encouraged to eat, drink, have sex with multiple partners, and take drugs. If they get bored they can always commit suicide and be brought back in a new body. Really the only thing that’s forbidden is murder. When our protagonist becomes bored and jaded we follow her in and out of various bodies and circumstances, until she breaks that one rule. She’s faced with a choice. Either she undergoes personality dissolution, in which all her memory will be wiped, or she is given a single, permanent body, and banished from 4B. The unnamed protagonist opts for banishment and finds herself in a desert, where she must make a life for herself. For the first time, she discovers that some sacrifices may be worthwhile, and that being human means making choices.

41erf8g69dl-_ac_us218_9. All This and Heaven Too by Rachel Fields– This book is a fictionalization of the life of Henriette Deluzy-Desportes, the author’s great aunt by marriage. In the mid 19th century, Henriette was the most notorious woman in France. Hired as the governess to the children of the Duc and Duchesse de Praslin, she quickly came to see the problems that existed in her employer’s marriage. She and the Duc formed a close (platonic) relationship based largely on their mutual interest in the children- an interest which the Duchesse didn’t share. However, the Duchesse was aware of the closeness that existed between her husband and the governess and felt threatened. She dismissed Henriette without a letter of recommendation, and then met a tragic end. The gossip surrounding the relationship between Henriette and the Duc, as well as the circumstances surrounding Henriette’s dismissal, meant that both fell under suspicion of murder. Forced to defend herself in a trial, Henriette soon becomes hated by a nation, making life there impossible. So she flees to America where she starts anew like so many others. In 1940 this was made into a film starring Bette Davis and Charles Boyer. However, despite the film’s popularity, the literary source material has fallen by the wayside. The film focuses on the first half of the story, ending with Henriette’s departure for America. However, the book follows her to her new life. While it’s less dramatic than the first half (with accusations of adultery and murder!) it’s interesting to see what became of this remarkable woman.

51polcsfrl-_ac_us218_10. Forever Amber by Kathleen Winsor– When this came out in 1944 it caused quite a stir, but it seems like few people know it now. If I had to compare it to another book, I’d compare it to Gone With the Wind. Amber is a very Scarlett-like heroine. But Scarlett O’Hara was born with a silver spoon, whereas Amber St. Clare is pregnant, abandoned, and penniless when we first meet her. Amber navigates the streets of 17th century London, through the Great Plague of London and the Great Fire of 1666, eventually rising to be the favorite mistress of King Charles II. But she keeps her heart true to the only man she’s ever loved; a man who she can never have.  Several historical figures appear as characters in the book, such as Charles II, Nell Gwyn, Barbara Palmer, George Villiers, and more. It was banned as pornographic is fourteen states, was condemned by the Catholic Church for indecency and was banned in Australia.  What’s remarkable is that there’s really nothing explicit. Yes, Amber has a number of affairs, but for the most part, they take place behind closed doors.  It sold about three million copies worldwide and was made into a film in 1947, but if I mention to a historical fiction fan, chances are that they won’t know what I’m talking about.

 

 

 

A to Z Reading Survey

I found this on Gin & Lemonade‘s blog and thought it looked like fun:

Author you’ve read the most books from:

It’s hard to say. Some are more prolific than others so I’ve read more from them even if they’re not my “favorite” authors. According to Goodreads I’ve read 19 books by LM Montgomery, 18 by Juliet Marillier, 17 by Lisa Gardener, 15 by Mercedes Lackey, 15 by Marian Keyes, 15 by Phillippa Gregory

But I wouldn’t say that they’re my favorite authors. Just that they’ve written more than a lot of other authors that I read.

Best Sequel Ever:

Hmmm… This one is hard! I’m thinking of book two in my favorite series… Often the second books aren’t my favorites! My initial instinct is to say Anne of Avonlea but I don’t want to be too predictable, so I’ll say Emily Climbs. It’s the sequel to Emily of New Moon and it’s by the same author.

Currently Reading:

Just started Marlena by Julie Buntin. So far it’s good but I’ve only read the first few chapters so far.

Drink of Choice While Reading:

Tea. Iced in warm weather, hot in the cold.

E-reader or Physical Book?

I’ll read an ebook on occasion but I far prefer physical books. If I read something as an ebook I feel less like I’ve read it. Does that make sense? Probably not!

Fictional Character You Probably Would Have Actually Dated In High School:

51kc21bqngl-_ac_us218_Hmm… This is surprisingly tough because most of the guys in YA aren’t guys I’d want to date, and most of the guys in adult fiction are too old for high school me to date (have I been giving this too much thought?) Maybe Gilbert Blythe when he was high school age. He was always a sweetie!

Glad You Gave This Book A Chance:

Hmm… I remember when I read Crime and Punishment my senior year of high school. I didn’t think I’d hate it but given previous experiences with Russian literature I didn’t think I’d end up liking it. But I did. I don’t know if it qualifies as me “giving it a chance” since I had to read it for school. But we ended up talking about it in class at the same time that I was reading Donna Tartt’s The Secret History at home. Since Tartt’s novel alludes to Crime and Punishment quite a bit, the class discussions ended up enriching both books for me.

Hidden Gem Book:

Time and Chance by Alan Brennert- I actually just remembered the title and author of this one after only remembering the plot for a long time!

Important Moment in your Reading Life:

Probably the first time I fell in love with a book. The “problem” is that I’ve fallen in love with a lot of books from an early age.

Just Finished:

Touch by Courtney Maum

Kinds of Books You Won’t Read:

Non-fiction about topics that hold no interest for me.

Erotica

Graphic/gory horror

Longest Book You’ve Read:

According to Goodreads, it’s Clarissa by Samuel Richardson at 1,534 pages. I read it in college. Though I read a different edition from the one on there. I think my edition was probably a few hundred pages less. Mostly likely due to bonus material like introductions, footnotes etc.

Major book hangover because of:

517p1odjdbl-_ac_us218_51vp6vchi4l-_ac_us218_I suppose it depends on what we mean by “book hangover”. If we mean a book that stayed with me emotionally for a long time after I read it, The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barberry and A Little Life by Hana Yanagihara, are probably the most recent ones. I’ve read other great books since then but these lingered under my skin in some way.

Number of Bookcases You Own:

2. But my books are not limited to bookcases.

One Book You Have Read Multiple Times:

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. I think in college I was sort of obsessed with it. I did my senior project on it and discuss it a bit in this post.

Preferred Place To Read:

My bed. I can also go for a hot bathtub. I want to get a really comfy oversized chair just for reading.

Quote that inspires you/gives you all the feels from a book you’ve read:

“The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be 51tz5m0vibl-_ac_us218_intolerably stupid.” Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey (because sometimes a quote just a true thought perfectly into words)

“If you live to be a hundred, I want to live to be a hundred minus one day, so I never have to live without you.” – A.A. Milne, Winnie The Pooh (just simple and lovely)

“Isn’t it nice to think that tomorrow is a new day with no mistakes in it yet?”
― L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables (something I try to remember!)

Reading Regret:

You mean like a book I’ve never finished? Or one I wish I hadn’t read? I don’t understand…

Series You Started And Need To Finish(all books are out in series):

The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher- I don’t actually know if it’s complete but I’ve only read the first 6 and I think there are like 15 in all.

Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien

Tarien Soul by CL Wilson

The Maisie Dobbs series by Jacqueline Winspear- Again, I don’t know if it’s complete but I’ve only read the first 3 and there are many more out there.

The Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett

Three of your All-Time Favorite Books:

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter

It is insanely hard for me to limit this to just three books!!!

Unapologetic Fangirl For:

Outlander. I started reading the books over a decade ago. When the TV series started I revisited them and got hooked all over again.

Very Excited For This Release More Than All The Others:

At the moment I’m looking forward to Bellewether by Susanna Kearsley

Worst Bookish Habit

Planning to read more than I can get to.

Dog-earring pages.

X Marks The Spot: Start at the top left of your shelf and pick the 27th book:

Well, it doesn’t say which bookshelf, but I picked one at random. The 27th book is The Collector by John Fowles

Your latest book purchase:

I bought these at a used bookshop at the same time:

Messenger of Truth by Jacqueline Winspear

Dust and Shadow by Lyndsay Faye

The Night Watch by Sara Waters

A Curious Beginning by Deanna Raybourn

61xeuwoxcl-_ac_us218_ZZZ-snatcher book (last book that kept you up WAY late):

Probably Night Film by Marisha Pessl. I think that’s the last time I remember thinking “I should go to sleep. But I need to know what happens next!”

Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Have Been on My TBR Forever

For That Artsy-Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday

February 6: Books That Have Been On My TBR the Longest and I Still Haven’t Read

Initially, I thought “this is good because it allows me to revisit my vast TBR and see if there’s anything on it that no longer interests me.” Unfortunately, it seems like I won’t be able to make the list any shorter. Doing this just reminded me of how much is out there that I still haven’t read!

51u90swjwl-_ac_us218_1. Jane of Lantern Hill by LM Montgomery- Added June 10, 2010- Basically, I’m almost always up for LM Montgomery. This was one of the last books that she completed. It was published in 1937. She began writing a sequel, but she didn’t finish it before her death in 1942.

 

 

51nqwdcdk1l-_ac_us218_2. Before Green Gables by Budge Wilson- Added May 6, 2012- Initially, my impression was that this was an attempt to cash in on the popularity of Anne of Green Gables for its 100th anniversary. But the reviews are, for the most part, good, so I decided to give it a chance. I just haven’t done so yet!

 

 

51stziqnlpl-_ac_us218_3. Taste of Sorrow by Jude Morgan- Added June 8, 2013- I blame my Bronte obsession for this one. I’ve read several of Jude Morgans novels, finding some better than others. But I haven’t read his imagining of one of literature’s most famous families.

 

 

418ggw4js1l-_ac_us218_4. The Seance by John Harwood- Added June 17, 2013- I added this after reading and enjoying one of the author’s other novels, The Ghost Writer. I still plan to read it at some point!

 

 

 

51-yojeobol-_ac_us218_5. Grange House by Sarah Blake- Added June 17, 2013 – This is pseudo-Victorian gothic novel, which is one of my favorite genres. According to Amazon, it features a ghost story, a love story, a family saga, and a mystery.

 

 

 

51hzkq6uiel-_ac_us218_6. Nine Coaches Waiting by Mary Stewart- Added  June 17, 2013- I’m a big fan of Mary Stewart but I’ve somehow managed to miss one of her most famous novels. I’ve also managed to have it on my TBR  for almost five years and not get to it!

 

 

41ymby0gnxl-_ac_us218_7. Anna by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles- Added  September 20, 2013- I really enjoyed the first two books in Cynthia Harrod-Eagles The War at Home series (note to self: make sure the other three books are also on your TBR) but I didn’t like the start of her Morland Dynasty series. I decided to give her work another chance though with The Kirov Trilogy, about a young Englishwoman who goes to St. Petersberg to be a governess to the children of a count.

 

51ziknwmo7l-_ac_us218_8. Angels of Destruction by Keith Donohue- Added November 1, 2013- I put this on my list after reading Donohue’s debut The Stolen Child. Since then, I’ve also read and enjoyed his The Boy Who Drew Monsters. But this book seems to revisit some of the themes that Donohue dealt with in The Stolen Child- particularly missing children, parental grief, and children with unexplained origins.

 

51uhbuwfkkl-_ac_us218_9. Palisades Park by Alan Brennert– Added November 2, 2013- I added this book to my list after reading Honolulu and Moloka’i by Alan Brennert. Unlike those two novels, this one doesn’t take place in Hawaii. It’s set in New Jersey in the 1930s, at and around the Palisades Amusement Park.

 

 

51ucsihmw9l-_ac_us218_10. The Town in Bloom by Dodie Smith- Added December 22, 2013- I think that I decided to read more of Dodie Smith’s work after finished (and loving!) I Capture the Castle. But I didn’t get farther than putting several titles on my TBR! I think this one especially appealed to me because it was set in the London theatre world.