Top Ten Tuesday: Longest Books

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For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday

October 9: Longest Books I’ve Ever Read

In most cases, these are based on the edition that I read/own.

51v43macoil-_ac_us218_1. Clarissa by Samuel Richardson (1534 pages)- I read this one in college. I enjoyed the class where I read this, and I don’t remember it being quite this long, but we read a different edition, so it’s possible it was slightly adapted.

 

 

 

51autt1ny5l-_ac_us218_2. Les Miserables by Victor Hugo (1488 pages)- In my high school French class we read an adaptation of this (like, a major adaptation. The book we read had about 120 pages. It was really more of a synopsis written in French!) and I read the whole brick (er… book) in college. I definitely think it’s a beautiful book but I could have done with less exploration of the sewer system in 19th century Paris.

 

51j4urrkj3l-_ac_us218_3. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy (1296 pages)- This was another college read. My professor called Tolstoy a “great writer who could have used a great editor.” I think that sums up my stance on it!

 

 

 

51qrndx-oxl-_ac_us218_4. Shogun by James Clavell (1152 pages) I read this in high school and really enjoyed it. It was an interesting depiction of a European encountering an entirely different kind of life in feudal Japan. From what I understand now, this had some issues with historical accuracy, but it was still enjoyable.

 

 

51aradik9al-_ac_us218_5. Sarum by Edward Rutherford (1059 pages) I remember reading this book as a teenager. I liked parts of it and disliked other parts. I know it was about Stonehenge (and England in general) and it told different stories set there over different time periods. But I couldn’t tell you anything about any of those stories.

 

 

519tffz6szl-_ac_us218_6. Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke  (1024 pages) I definitely wanted to like this book more than I did. I loved the idea of a fictional “study” of magic in 19th century England. I liked the story of the rivalry between two magicians. But ultimately, this felt like a chore to read.

 

 

419c5syx7xl-_ac_us218_7. The Fiery Cross by Diana Gabaldon (1008 pages) The Outlander series is made up of long books, but the fifth is definitely the longest. Or maybe it felt longer because it wasn’t as fast moving as some of the other books in the series. A lot of character development happens here, but it’s primarily a transitional book. It serves to bring the characters relationships to where they need to be for book six.

 

51polcsfrl-_ac_us218_8. Forever Amber by Kathleen Winsor (986 pages) I remember a few scenes from this book vividly but a lot of it I remember as a sort of montage. I read it in college, I think. Amber was a compelling character and the book definitely left me wondering what would become of her in the future.

 

 

51vxh2jgv8l-_ac_us218_9. Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell (960 pages) I think of Scarlett O’Hara as sort of Amber’s (see above) literary sister. Both are determined, glamorous, selfish, and scandalous. Both books also tell long stories that ultimately leave the reader in a place where we’re still wondering what will happen next to the characters. I suppose it’s a feat to write a book that’s nearly 1000 pages long, and leave readers wanting more!

 

51an8oy5w4l-_ac_us218_10. Hawaii by James Michener (937 pages) This book tells the story of several families over the course of Hawaii’s history. I remember some of the later portions but the earlier ones don’t come to mind at all. It’s been a long time since I read this though.

 

 

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: TV Shows Based on Books

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

September 4: Bingeworthy TV Shows/Amazing Movies (The new fall TV season is starting up this month, so let’s talk about what shows everyone should watch when they’re not reading!)

I decided to look at TV series based on books. But I set myself some rules for this list. I have to have seen the TV series and read the book. The TV series also had to be something that ran continuously for at least a full reason, rather than a simple 2-3 part miniseries.

1. Big Little Lies- The big change here was moving the setting of the story from Australia (in the book)  to California. Originally this was intended to be one season, but then it was renewed for a second season. I don’t know what they’re going to do with the second season though, because the first season was based on the book. The book has no sequel.

2. Pillars of the Earth– This novel was initially adapted as an eight-episode miniseries. Then the sequel, World Without End, was given a miniseries as well. Now that there’s a third book, A Column of Fire, let’s see if Starz continues doing adaptations. It’s worth noting that each book is set a few hundred years apart, but all deal with events in and around Kingsbridge cathedral.

3. Outlander– This adaptation of Diana Gabaldon’s series seems to be sticking to a 1 season to 1 book model, with the first three seasons of the show corresponding to the first three books in the series. There are changes for the screen of course, but the overall story that the TV series seems to be telling still seems in line with what the books are doing. More often than not the changes are for the sake of simplicity.

4. Alias Grace– This Netflix miniseries adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel of the same name is pretty faithful. It’s six episodes long, and doesn’t seem to aspire to renewal, which makes sense because the novel comes to a definite conclusion. What I appreciated about the adaptation here was the fact that it maintained the same ambiguity that the novel did. Things aren’t clearly laid out, but rather are left open to interpretation.

5. Anne of Green Gables– Anne has been given a wonderful miniseries adaptation that I discuss a bit here. But that doesn’t apply because according to my self-imposed rules I can’t choose anything that has only 2 or 3 parts. However, Netflix’s Anne with An E applies. It makes some interesting creative choices and significantly diverts from the cannon toward the end of the first season. I haven’t seen the second season yet for that reason.  I need to be in the right mood to be willing to accept those divergences.

6. Sharp Objects– I’m still in the process of watching this miniseries based on the novel by Gillian Flynn, so if there are any significant changes in later episodes, don’t tell me! So far it seems like they’re sticking fairly close to the book though.

7. Dexter– The first season of this show stays pretty close to Jeff Lindsay’s first novel in the book series that inspired it. The second season diverts so that while the premise is the same (sympathetic serial killer works with the cops by day, takes out bad guys by night, and tries to balance his “normal” life with it all) but not much else is. Though I’ve only read the first two books of the series so perhaps there are returns later on. Also a note, that in the last few seasons the show takes a major downturn.

8. The Lynley and Havers series– The TV show for some reason focuses more on Inspector Lynley than Havers (who is far more attractive and far less interesting in her TV incarnation than in the books) but otherwise, the first few seasons of this show are fairly in line with the source material by Elizabeth George.

9. Bleak House– This is an eight-hour miniseries that was aired in the UK in 30-minute segments. In the US it aired in six installments the first and last being two hours long and the rest was one hour. It was later rebroadcast in four two hour segments. The series was shot and was designed to air in a soap opera format. The logic of using this format was the Dickens wrote popular, long, serialized narratives much like soap operas. It’s true that the novel was originally released in monthly installments, ending with cliffhangers. Regardless of the intention, this miniseries does its source material proud.

10. The White Queen is a 10 episode adaptation of the first three novels in Phillippa Gregory’s Cousin’s War series (The White Queen, The Red Queen, The Kingmaker’s Daughter).  The White Princess is an eight-episode follow up that adapts the later two novels in the series; the titular novel and The King’s Curse. Starz has announced that it will make a third entry in the series called The Spanish Princess that will adapt parts of The King’s Curse not depicted in The White Princess, as well as the novel The Constant Princess. Of course, when multiple novels are being adapted like this, there’s considerable streamlining!

Top Ten Tuesday: Time Travel

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

This week’s topic was

August 7: Books You’d Mash Together (pick two books you think would make an epic story if combined) (Submitted by Rissi @ Finding Wonderland)

But I wasn’t really feeling it, so I decided to do my own thing and look at some favorite time travel stories.

51usp91evll-_ac_us218_1. The Doomsday Book by Connie Willis– This novel is the first in Willis’ Oxford Time Travel series dealing with time traveling Oxford historians. It’s the only one I’ve read so far, but the others are very much on my TBR. Set in the near future, historians often time travel to observe the past. Kirvin, a historian specializing in medieval history goes to the year 1320. But she gets sick as soon as she gets there and is moved from her “drop point”  by rescuers from a nearby manor. Shortly after Kirvin travels, Oxford suffers an influenza epidemic. While she was traveling back time, a technician (who was ill) input the wrong code, sending Kirvin to the year 1348, during the Black Death. With illness overwhelming people in both timelines, a rescue mission is attempted to get Kirvin back where she belongs.

51xphws9jdl-_ac_us218_2. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon– When WWII ends, British combat nurse Claire Randall and her husband Frank take a second honeymoon. They’ve been apart for most of the war and need to reconnect. When Claire goes to pick some flowers near a circle of standing stones, she somehow ends up in 1743. She meets up with the Mackenzie clan, a group of highlanders traveling back to their home, and provides some much needed medical care. Suspected of being a British spy, the Mackenzies bring her back with them to their home. But when Frank’s ancestor, the sadistic redcoat, Jack Randall, wants to take Claire, prisoner, the only way to escape his reach is to marry a Scot. Enter Jamie Fraser. He’s got a price on his head and a back full of scars (both thanks to Jack Randall) and he’s willing to help her out.  Claire is conflicted (is it technically bigamy if Frank hasn’t been born yet?)  but desperate. She marries Jamie, planning to return to the stones and the twentieth century as soon as she can get away. What she doesn’t anticipate is the soul-deep connection she and Jamie form. By the time she finds herself back at the stones, she must decide where she really belongs.

51541s04lal-_ac_us218_3. Time and Again by Jack Finney- Si Morley is a thirty-something advertising artist, who is recruited to join a secret government experiment in time travel. Aside from the chance to get away from his fairly dull life, Si’s friend, Kate, has a half-burned letter from 1882 and he wants to find out the truth behind it. Si has no intention of changing the past, but he finds himself drawn into the lives of the people in the boarding house where he’s staying. Especially Julia, a young woman who is marrying a fellow whom Si suspects might be a nasty piece of work. While the government in the twentieth century is having conflicts about how time travel should be used, Si finds himself amidst ethical and romantic conflicts in both centuries. This book has a sequel called From Time to Time, which I haven’t read, but this book can definitely work as a standalone.

51brip0dil-_ac_us218_4. Somewhere in Time by Richard Matheson– Just to avoid confusion, this novel was originally titled Bid Time Return. The title was changed when it was adapted for a film (which is very different from the book, but I also recommend it). Richard Collier is a playwright who is staying in a historic hotel in San Deigo. He sees a picture of an actress, who performed at the hotel in 1897. Something about the photograph strikes him and he begins to research the life of the actress, Elise McKenna. As he learns about this woman’s life, he becomes sort of obsessed with her and travels back in time via hypnosis. He meets Elise McKenna at the hotel, and they fall in love, to the dismay of her manager who just can’t believe that Richard doesn’t object to Elise continuing to work as an actress after she marries Richard. But can Richard stay in the past forever?

51cmzm27jl-_ac_us218_5. Replay by Ken Grimwood– Jeff Winston is a forty-three-year-old man, who is a little bored with his life. Until he has a fatal heart attack and wakes up again at the age of eighteen. He still remembers his life until the age of forty-three, even though that hasn’t happened yet. So Jeff decides to live his life over again. He makes some very good bets on sports and in the stock market and becomes wealthy.  He rectifies previous mistakes. And then he reaches the age of forty-three, dies again, and wakes up at the age of eighteen. On each go-round, Jeff gains something that he’s reluctant to lose. Even more so when he discovers that he’s not the only person on this weird little carousel. In other hands, this could feel redundant, meeting the same characters and seeing the same events over and over. But Grimwood wisely keeps his focus on Jeff as a character and how he changes in each incarnation; the new understandings he gains and the things he can’t bear to leave behind.

51pclzvhwel-_ac_us218_6. The Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger- Henry suffers from Chrono-Displacement Disorder. Occasionally he finds himself pulled to moments in his life that have a strong emotional significance. He falls in love with Clare and they get married. Clare and Henry try to live normal lives with steady jobs and children, in spite of Henry’s condition.  A lot of Clare’s time is spent waiting for Henry. She meets a thirty-six-year-old Henry when she is only a child because Future Henry traveled back in time. She spends much of her childhood waiting to meet him in her own timeline. Though each chapter has the date on which it takes place, we often encounter Henry at a different age than the age he would be at that date. In some cases, we also encounter duplicate Henrys (his current self, meeting his future self) which can get a bit confusing. But if you give it time and thought it’s very much worth the effort.

51tyxvqweyl-_ac_us218_7. The House on the Strand by Daphne DuMaurier– Professor Magnus Lane is spending the summer in London, so he gives his friend, Dick Young his Cornwall house to stay in. Dick arrives a bit before the rest of his family and Lane persuades him to take an experimental drug that will send him back in time. When Dick takes the drug, he witnesses a drama in the same Cornwall location 600 years earlier. This drama is compelling enough for Dick to disregard the danger and take the drug again and again, in order to see more. His addiction begins to take a toll on his twentieth-century life. Eventually, he comes to confuse the two eras, which has a destructive effect on Dick’s marriage and his family. The reader is aware that the drug is detrimental, but we’re in a similar position to Dick. We also want to know how events in the 14th century will play out, so we want Dick to take it “just one more time” to see what happens.

51t3kmsupxl-_ac_us218_8. The Valley of the Moon by Melanie Gideon– In 1975, single mother Lux Lysander is overworked and underpaid. When her five-year-old son goes to visit his grandparents Lux decides to take a vacation herself. She goes to Sonoma Valley. One night, she sees a point of light in the distance. She goes to see what it is and finds herself in a sunlight field. The people she meets dress and speak like they’re from another time. Because they are.  Greengage is cut off from the rest of the world and from time itself. They are stuck in the early twentieth century. Unlike the residents of Greengage, Lux seems to have the ability to come and go. She is drawn to Greengage and the people who live there. It’s the only place she’s ever really felt completely at home. But her beloved son is very much a child of the modern world.

51islkdgaql-_ac_us218_9. The River of No Return by Bee Ridgeway– In 1815, Lord Nicholas Davenant dies on a Napoleonic battlefield. Or so it seems. He actually went forward in time 200 years, and finds himself in the early 21st century, being taken care of by a secret society called The Guild. Told that he can’t return to his own time, Nick makes a life for himself. But several years later, he’s contacted by The Guild again and told that he needs to return to his own time and find a mysterious enemy who has a device that controls time. In the nineteenth century, Nick’s childhood acquaintance Julia Percy’s grandfather dies. Julia’s grandfather had a secret. He could stop time, and Julia seems to share that ability. This will bring her back into Nick’s life as they find themselves caught up in a historical conspiracy.

51uj1ebhu0l-_ac_us218_10. Lightning by Dean Koontz– Laura Shane was born on a  dark and stormy night in 1955. A mysterious stranger showed up and prevented a drunk doctor from attending the difficult delivery, thereby indirectly saving Laura’s life. This same stranger turns up at several points during Laura’s life, saving her each time. When she grows up, the man, whose name is Stefan, once again saves the widowed Laura and her young son, Chris. Now he tells Laura who he is and where he’s come from. She and Chris and the world they live in are in terrible danger. At first, the explanation seems like a letdown (it did to me at least) but the time travel paradoxes provide an additional twist, that made things more interesting.

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Lived Up To The Hype

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday

July 31: Popular Books that Lived Up to the Hype

When a book is really hyped I tend to get nervous. There have been many times when a book resonates with the public a lot and just falls flat for me (Think Twilight, The Notebook, The DaVinci Code…).  But that said, these lived up to the acclaim

51-eyayn0ol-_ac_us218_1. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern– When this book came out it got a lot of praise, but I think that my expectations going into it were still low. I expected it to be overhyped. I was pleasantly surprised for the most part. Yes, there were some elements of the plot that didn’t completely work for me, but I found the writing lovely and the atmosphere wonderful.

 

51lsfidqpl-_ac_us218_2. Room by Emma Donoghue– Fortunately I read this pre-hype, not long after it was released. I think I read the whole thing in about a day because I couldn’t put it down! Not long after that, it started getting a lot of acclaim, which I felt like it deserved.

 

 

 

41qxofoqbxl-_ac_us218_3. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime by Mark Hadden– I forget what made me read this book. I was in college at the time and in my own little campus bubble, so I wasn’t all that aware of the hype around it. But that allowed me to come to it fresh and appreciate it for its own merits.

 

 

51jb19dy-ul-_ac_us218_4. Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding– I was skeptical of this one for a while. It had been popular for a while before I read it. I think I initially held off based on my general aversion to popular things. But the thing that made decide to pick it up was when I heard it was an adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.

 

 

51muf7bj-ll-_ac_us218_5. The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss– Several people had recommended this to me before I finally picked it up. I had low expectations in spite of the hype because I tend to be fussy about fantasy as a genre and the fact that it was very long made be a bit wary. It was also compared to a few books that I didn’t really enjoy. But I was pleasantly surprised.

 

51xipv5h1l-_ac_us218_6. Go Tell A Watchman by Harper Lee– I’m probably one of the few people who did feel like this was worth the hype. Maybe it was a greedy move by the publisher but I found it an interesting companion piece to To Kill A Mockingbird. I think they way that Atticus was depicted makes sense. A lot of people’s racism comes out when they see a marginalized group leaving the niche that they once had, and becoming part of the mainstream discourse. And Scout’s awareness of her father’s racism also made sense because as an adult, she’s able to see him as a fallible human being rather than a hero.

51q2yi-diil-_ac_us218_7. The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin– My biggest problem with this books was the way it was structured. It’s about four siblings who are told the date of their deaths by a fortune teller. The rest of the book is divided into four parts: one per each child. The problem was that the first two parts were by far the most interesting! But in spite of that, I liked the way the book suggested that the deaths of some of these characters were a self-fulfilling prophecy.

51dvs6wngbl-_ac_us218_8. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak– By the time I got around to reading this one, it had been praised very highly. I was sort of expecting it to be the kind of emotionally manipulative thing that I often resent. But instead, it was poignant and heartbreaking.

 

 

51ozv7qacul-_sx260_9. Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon– I started reading this series in college. I’d seen it recommended in a lot of places, for fans of other books that I’ve enjoyed, but I was always a bit skeptical. One of my friends in college said that I’d like it, so I finally decided to give it a try. I’m glad I did!

 

 

51iosghk0l-_ac_us218_10. Harry Potter series by JK Rowling– I think the first Harry Potter book came out when I was a pre-teen, but I didn’t read it then. I actually held off on the series until college, based on the logic that something that popular had to be total crap. But I finally decided to give it a shot and was surprised to learn that popular books can (sometimes!) be good.

Top Ten Tuesday: Red, White and Blue

For the That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

July 3: Books with Red, White, & Blue Covers (In honor of the 4th of July in the USA. Choose covers with your own country’s colors if you prefer!)

I went with a top nine this week so I could do three books for each color. And I’ve done a little shameless self-promotion on the last one. I promise I’ll try not to do that too often!

51ixaf4tmsl-_ac_us218_1. The Eight by Katherine Neville– In 1972, a computer expert, Cat Velis is sent to Algeria for a special assignment. She finds herself trying to unravel the mystery of the Montglane Service, a chess set that was gifted to Emperor Charlemagne from the Moors. Legend has it that the set holds the key to unlimited power. Two hundred years earlier, Mireille, a novice at Montglane Abbey must help her cousin Valentine disperse the pieces of the chess set before they fall into the wrong hands. The stories of Cat and Mireille intertwine in unexpected ways as they go about their similar goals, two hundred years apart. But the only way to stop the violence, conspiracy, and betrayal that follows the chess set, may be to unlock its dangerous secrets.

51myhqwnyyl-_ac_us160_2. The Rules Do Not Apply by Ariel Levy– In 2012, Ariel Levy left the US for a reporting trip to Mongolia. At the time, she was pregnant, married, financially secure, and had a successful career. A month later, she returned to the US and none of that was true anymore. Ariel Levy was raised to rebel against traditional gender roles. She was raised to believe that she could be anything. She built an unconventional life, that she was happy in. But nothing comes without a cost. Sometimes that cost is simply the result of bad luck. Sometimes it’s a result of bad decisions, and sometimes it comes from being blind to what we don’t want to see. For Ariel Levy, it was probably a combination of the three factors. But when your life falls apart, the only thing you can do is learn what you can from the experience, pick up the pieces, and keep going. To her credit, that’s what Levy did.

51d91qzjhsl-_ac_us218_3. The Casual Vacancy by JK Rowling– I decided to feature this book because I think I’m one of the few people who liked it. I guess one reason was that I wasn’t expecting anything like Harry Potter. Another is that I felt that even though the tone was bleak, it was appropriate for the material. It was billed as a dark comedy, but Rowling said that she thinks of it more as a “comic tragedy” and I think that’s a good description. Set in a suburban town called Pagford, the book begins with the death of a Parish Councillor. WIth his seat suddenly vacant, an election must take place. The candidates find their secrets come to like on the Parish Council online forum. These secrets pit rich against poor, husband against wife, one family against another. By the time the casual vacancy is resolved, Pagford may be forever changed.

519ak8fcsvl-_ac_us218_4. The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown– The Andreas family love to read. Their father, a Shakespearean scholar speaks almost entirely in verse named his three daughters after the Bard’s heroines. When their mother falls sick with breast cancer the three sisters return home to help out during her treatment. But they’ve got their own drama going on. Rosalind still lives in her hometown, and can’t quite keep her nose out of the rest of the family’s business. But it’s for the own good. Surely they can’t manage without her! Bianca is a NYC attorney whose need for the glamorous life may have left her with nothing. Cordelia is a flighty bohemian who has just realized that she’s pregnant that her carefree lifestyle will have to change. When they’re all under the same roof again, the Andreas girls fall into old patterns. But they also learn that coming together may be the way out of their problems.

41qfdmnyvxl-_ac_us218_5. The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls–  Rex and Rose Mary Wells had four children. Rex taught his children physics, geology and how to embrace life. He was also a destructive alcoholic. Rose Mary was an “excitement addict” who couldn’t bear to cook for her family when she could be painting a picture (after all the dinner will last for as long as it takes people to eat it, but art is forever). For the first six years of Jeanette’s life, they roamed around Arizona and California. But once the excitement of that life (and money) faded they retreated to West Virginia. Financial difficulties made Rex’s drinking worse and Jeannette and her siblings were often left to fend for themselves. But for all their parents’ many faults, they maintained a deep affection for them. In this memoir, Walls details how she and her siblings became successful despite the odds against them, and even pays tribute to her unconventional upbringing.

51aznmcwg9l-_ac_us218_6.  The White Album by Joan Didion- This book of essays by Joan Didion. It covers a variety of subjects but tends to center around California (and the US in general) in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s as a place of simultaneous paranoia and detachment. In the title essay, Didion describes her own psychological issues as well as her experience as a journalist covering the Black Panthers and the Manson trials.  Other essays in the volume cover subjects ranging from Doris Lessing and Georgia O’Keefe to the Hoover Dam and water in the desert. It’s interesting to look at what seemed to be a chaotic time in America from a contemporary perspective. While the tensions and threats of the late 1970’s/early 1970’s don’t quite seem quaint, I did have the impulse to tell the people “you ain’t seen nothing yet!” A few years ago I might have said that a lot of the things that made people nervous at that time were no longer huge issues, or were at least significantly better. Reading it now it’s hard to say whether we’re better or worse off.

51xphws9jdl-_ac_us218_7. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon– Nurse Claire Randall and her husband, Frank, were separated by WWII for most of their marriage.  After the war ends, in an effort to reconnect, they take a second honeymoon to Scotland. When Claire goes near a standing stone, she suddenly finds herself in Scotland circa 1743 facing Frank’s ancestor Jack Randall. Jack Randall is a sadistic bully who assaults her. To escape, Claire falls in with the Mackenzie clan. They take her to their home, where her medical skill is valued even though some suspect her of being a British spy. All Claire wants to do is go home. But Jack Randall is a powerful Redcoat, who wants Claire for his own purposes. The only way to avoid becoming his prisoner is to marry a Scot. Enter Jamie. Claire doesn’t know much about him other than the fact that he’s related to the Mackenzie’s but is not a member of the clan. He’s got a price his head and scars on his back (both thanks to Jack Randall) and he’s willing to marry her. Claire endures kidnapping and being tried as a witch, with the loyal, devoted Jamie always on her side. But when she finds herself before the standing stones once again, she’s forced to decide where she truly belongs.

41-f8aif5zl-_ac_us218_8. Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier- At a Confederate military hospital, Inman recovers from wounds sustained in battle. He’s tired of fighting for a cause in which he doesn’t believe, and he sneaks away from the hospital to return to his home, Cold Mountain, North Carolina, where his beloved Ada waits for him. Meanwhile, on Cold Mountain, Ada’s father has died, and Ada struggles to survive on the family farm, with the help of her friend Ruby. We follow Inman on his journey home, constantly threatened by the Confederate Home Guard who hunt down military deserters. We also follow the challenges that Ada and Ruby face on Cold Mountain. This novel mirrors Homer’s Odyssey as we see the soldier returning from war, and the faithful wife waiting for him. But in this case, Inman is not a victor but a deserter on the losing side, and Ada, though faithful, is very changed when Inman finally gets back.

51noohzpcsl-_ac_us218_9. Beautiful by Fran Laniado– Is this cheating? I don’t care if it is. This is my blog, and my novel is being published tomorrow, so I’m gonna plug it. So there!  Eimear is Faerie. She left the land of her birth,  to find a place where she felt like she could belong. She finds herself in the World, and she begins to build a life for herself. But when she encounters Finn, supernaturally beautiful but thoughtless and selfish, she gets angry. In a fit of rage, she casts a spell on Finn.  It’s a spell that she can’t undo, even when she discovers that she’s ruined Finn’s life. Finn is wealthy, arrogant,  and cruel. He didn’t think twice about insulting Eimear until it was too late.  Now, exiled from the only home he’s ever known, he is forced to make his own way, for the first time ever. He does have support- if he wants it. Eimear wants to assuage her guilt by helping him. In an isolated place, thrown together initially out of desperation and need, Eimear and Finn find a way to live together.  That alliance eventually blossoms into friendship, and even love. But before they can have their happily ever after, Eimear must go on a perilous journey that will force her to confront everything that she ran away from when she left Faerie.

 

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Want To Get Early

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

May 1: Books I’d Slay a Lion to Get Early (Submitted by Emma)

I’m assuming that the topic for today is a hyperbole because however anxious I am to read these, I’m not in the habit of lion slaying. Most of these are from authors/series that I already know and trust. Hey, if I’m going to take on a lion to get one of these books, they’d better be worth it!

614yl-rg-3l-_ac_us218_1. Bellewether by Susanna Kearsley- I really just want this because I’m excited to have a new Kearsley book to read. A Desperate Fortune came out in 2015, so it’s been a few years! I like this cover but I’m not sure, I may prefer the Canadian cover simply because it’s more consistent with most of my other Kearsley books.

Release Date:  August 7, 2018

 

41ysobpyonl-_ac_us218_2. The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton– Morton is another author whose work I have followed for years. Her last novel, The Lake House, came out in 2015, so I’m more than ready for a new one. This isn’t the cover, the actual cover art hasn’t been revealed yet.

Release Date: October 9, 2018

 

 

sequel-where-the-light3. Where the Light Enters by Sara Donati– I enjoyed Donati’s Wilderness series and I liked The Gilded Hour even better. While several plot lines were resolved in The Gilded Hour, there were some major ones that weren’t. I want to see how those play out. The cover shown here isn’t the book’s actual cover. Rather it’s a temporary cover stolen from the author’s website.

Release Date: Unknown

lethal_white_by_robert_galbraith_us4. Lethal White by Robert Galbraith (aka JK Rowling)- Again it’s been three years since Career of Evil, the last Cormoran Strike novel. That one left us with a cliffhanger regarding the relationship between two major characters. I’ve been waiting to see how that plays out! The cover shown here was a fanmade cover based on the artwork of previous books in the series. It is not the real cover.

Release Date: Unknown

51lpw3sd0sl-_ac_us218_5. Bare Knuckle by Cindy Brandner– I really enjoyed Brandner’s Exit Unicorns. I’m reading the rest of the series slowly so that I’m not left too long with nothing to read. But since Bare Knuckle is a prequel to Exit Unicorns, I think I’ll be OK  reading it, even though I haven’t finished the whole series.

Release Date:  May 1, 2018

 

51qjgmeqg6l-_ac_us218_6. Neverworld Wake by Marisha Pessl– I loved Pessl’s Night Film, and this boarding school set murder mystery seems right up my alley!

Release Date:  June 5, 2018

 

 

515y9hgrwzl-_ac_us218_7. The Paragon Hotel by Lyndsay Faye– I discovered Lyndsay Faye via Jane Steele, and her next book is a murder mystery set in the 1920s and it sounds really good!

 

 

 

51o1uxkkkl-_ac_us218_8. A Question of Trust by Penny Vincenzi– Penny Vincenzi is always a bit of a guilty pleasure for me. Her books are long, glamorous and just soapy enough to float. This is her latest.

Release Date: July 10, 2018

 

 

514bydpfbhl-_ac_us218_9. When We Caught Fire by Anne Godberson– Anne Godberson’s Luxe series is another major guilty, soapy, pleasure. I’m looking forward to her upcoming historical novel, about the love triangle that supposedly caused the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.

Release Date: Oct 2, 2018

 

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From Gabaldon’s site: The images above on this page show an ancient Egyptian amulet with a bee hieroglyph. Ancient Egyptians were the first documented beekeepers in human history, dating to 5,000 years ago.

10. Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone by Diana Gabaldon– According to Gabaldon, the Outlander series will be 10 books in all making this the second to last.  I’m looking forward to seeing the Frasers and MacKenzies reunited on the Ridge once again, hoping that the Revolutionary War finally ends and that the whole crew survives it. According to buzz (no pun intended), it won’t hit bookshelves until 2019-ish. The title refers to the Celtic custom of talking to one’s bees that made it to the Appalachians. It was believed that a beekeeper should tell the bees if someone is born, dies, comes, or leaves, because if they’re not informed they’ll fly away. Of course, that information makes me wonder if the title is literal or metaphorical, and who the speaker is.

Release Date: Unknown

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Could Re-read Forever

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday

February 27: Books I Could Re-read Forever

I’m usually not a huge re-reader. I have a whole list of books that want to re-read, but my TBR so big that I rarely spend time on stuff I’ve already read. But even so, there are some books that I’ve revisited over the years. A lot of them tend to be books I read at some point during my childhood, because I was more of a rereader then. But making this list has definitely inspired me to do more re-reads!

51tt9v9vjl-_ac_us218_1. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte- I wrote a bit about my journey with this book a while back. I read it for the first time in high school and was sort of shocked by the disparity between its reputation as a tragic romance, and the actual content of the book. I felt like the various narrative frames kept me at a distance and that there was some kind of elusive content that I was just missing. Those very qualities have made it an interesting re-read. I understand it differently each time I read it. At different points, it’s Freudian, feminist, sadomasochistic, gothic, and subversive.

51fkpmqzdyl-_ac_us218_2. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte- The first time I read this, also in high school, I loved it. I thought it was a lovely romance with a happy ending and a heroine I could root for. When I re-read it in college I realized that while it was all those things, it was also a lot more. There was a subtext that I’d completely missed on my first read through; regarding colonialism, gender relations, religion, morality, and autonomy. There were parallels that had gone over my head the first time. For example, Jane and Bertha are presented as two sides of the same coin. Jane is depicted as impulsive, willful and even violent as a child (see her behavior with the Reeds, the red room etc) she eventually masters these traits in a way that Bertha isn’t able to.

51dxbewzuil-_ac_us218_3. The work of LM Montgomery- Maybe this is cheating but I can’t pick just one book here. As I kid I wanted to be Anne Shirley. As a slightly older kid, I wanted to be Emily Starr. As a teen, I discovered The Blue Castle for the first time. They’re all books that I find myself wanting to revisit at different points. There’s something comforting about them.Maybe it’s the landscape of Prince Edward Island that I’m attracted to, or maybe the smart female characters appeal to me.  Maybe I like different things at different points.

51ozv7qacul-_sx260_4. The Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon- The first time reading through this series I read for plot. They’re pretty densely plotted books, and because I was invested in the characters I wanted to see what happened to them. I’ve re-read parts now that the TV series is airing and I’m sort of shocked at how much I missed on those initial read thoughts. A lot of character development happened that I wasn’t aware of because I was focused elsewhere! I missed a lot of subtle cues, foreshadowing, and even sub-plots. I suppose that there’s only so much you can focus on in one read through.

51iosghk0l-_ac_us218_5. The Harry Potter series by JK Rowling- I suppose in this way I’m a true product of my generation. I haven’t read them all the way through multiple times though. Like the Outlander series, my re-reads have been in bits and pieces. I’ve read parts of several later books more times that several earlier books, for example, though as I read later books I revisited earlier ones to refresh my memory of what happened. It seems to be the later four books or so that I’ve revisited the most. Maybe that’s because there was more happening in them than in the first three.

51srrilel-_ac_us218_6. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott- The first time I read this, I was obsessed with Jo. I wanted to be Jo. I still love her, but on later read-throughs, I focused on the journeys of the other characters. For example, it’s easy to overlook Meg and Beth the first time through. They’re not as attention-grabbing as Jo and Amy. I definitely dismissed them as “the boring one” and “the tragic one” until I re-read it and realized that they were just as compelling in their own ways as Jo and Amy were.

51uvxo85zl-_ac_us218_7. Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell- This may be cheating because I haven’t reread it in a long time, but there was a point in my childhood where I would read this book, finish it, and then just start reading again! I should probably reread it at some point if only to understand why I was so obsessed with it at one point. Maybe the isolation of the main character appealed to me. Maybe it was the fact that she bravely faced a situation that would probably leave me a quivering lump of fear. Maybe it’s the fact that her ordeal didn’t end when she was “rescued”. It could have been the fact that this is based on a true story. Or it could be that different things appealed to me different times.

511prxozevl-_ac_us218_8. Here’s to You Rachel Robinson by Judy Blume- When I was about ten or eleven I was obsessed with this book. Maybe it was the main character who appealed to me. Maybe it was the dynamic between her and her family and her friends. Or maybe it was Jeremy Dragon, who was my first book boyfriend. In retrospect, I don’t even know why he appealed to me as much as he did. He wasn’t even a major character. But I suppose the element of wish fulfillment in a guy you have a crush on actually liking you, was something that appealed to me at the time.

614tt378kel-_ac_us218_9. The Secret of Platform 13 by Eva Ibbotson- I’m not sure how old I was the first time I read this book. Maybe nine or ten? Like in Harry Potter, this book features a platform at King’s Cross Station in London, which leads to a magical world. But this platform only opens once every nine years, so when the prince of this magical world is stolen, the magical creatures have nine years to plan the rescue. Of course, that doesn’t mean that anything actually goes according to plan. I think that along with Harry Potter this appealed to the part of me that longed for something magic hidden alongside the mundane.

51cbwb1nmql-_ac_us218_10. Fairy Tales– I know that this is more of a genre/category than a book, but fairy tales were like a religious experience for me as a kid. I would read them compulsively. Before I could read myself, I had others read them to me over and over again. I sought out different versions of fairy tales. I was possibly the only four year old who could explain how the Disney version of Snow White differed from the Brother’s Grimm! Even now, fairy tales inspire a lot of my own writing.

 

My Bookish Identity Tag

My Bookish Identity

I was tagged by The Orang-utan Librarian the other day. So here is some info about my Bookish Identity.

  • What dystopian/fantastical world would you live in?
  • Who would your partner be?
  • Who would be your godly mother/father? [Percy Jackson]
  • Would you be a downworlder or nephilim? [Shadowhunter world]
  • Which house would you be in? [Harry Potter]
  • Which faction would you be in? [Divergent]
  • What would be your daemon [Northern Lights]

WHAT DYSTOPIAN/FANTASTICAL WORLD WOULD YOU LIVE IN?

I don’t think that I’d want to live in a dystopian world! Sometimes this world seems frighteningly close! But as far as fantastical…. I could go for the world of The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern. It’s strange and dreamy, and doesn’t seem like it’s ever boring!

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WHO WOULD YOUR PARTNER BE?

I suppose that depends on what kind of partner we’re talking about! Romantic partner? Business partner? Partner in crime? I think that Jamie Fraser in the Outlander series might actually do well as all three. He’s eternally devoted to his one true love, but he’s also a really smart, strategic thinker (when his emotions aren’t clouding his judgement).  He’s good at math, which could be useful in a business partner. Especially since I’m…not! Plus, he’s good at getting himself out of a tight spot, which would be useful for a partner in crime. Plus he’s tall and can reach things that are up high.

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WHO WOULD BE YOUR GODLY MOTHER/FATHER? [PERCY JACKSON]

I had to google this one since I haven’t read Percy Jackson. I took a quiz here and I am apparently a child of Demeter goddess of agriculture, grain, and bread. I don’t know if that makes me Persephone or just her sister…

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WOULD YOU BE A DOWNWORLDER OR A NEPHILIM [SHADOWHUNTER WORLD]

I’d probably be a Nephilim. I’m pretty firmly on the side of good. Not that there aren’t some shady Nephilim! But between that and a Downworlder I’m definitely Nephilim. (Just a note, I read the first 3 Shadowhunters books and that’s pretty much it. So if there are things we learn later that make this not applicable let me know!)

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WHICH HOUSE WOULD YOU BE IN? [HARRY POTTER]

Ravenclaw. I was definitely a “brain” in school. By that I mean that I was always reading, and always the really obnoxious kid with her hand raised to answer every question (regardless of whether or not I was right!). I love to read. I love to learn. I’m creative. I think the sorting hat would be pretty definitive.

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WHAT FACTION WOULD YOU BE IN? [DIVERGENT]

I think I have elements of all the factions in me. But I suppose that most of us do! I guess that Amity is the one I’d be most drawn to. I’m pretty peaceful. I try to be kind to everyone. I am very loyal to my friends, and I’m pretty forgiving.

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WHAT WOULD BE YOUR DAEMON? [NORTHERN LIGHTS]

This is a tough one. I actually had to do another quiz, because there are so many options! This is what I got.

You are someone who lives in the present and you care deeply about your friends, whom you consider to be your sisters and brothers. You know how to enjoy life. But if anything threatens your future or that of those you love, you will always be the first person to fight for it.

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Actually it’s probably pretty accurate.

I tag Emma, Caitlin Stern, Jessica, Cam, and  Holly.

Top Ten Tuesday: Bookish Settings I’d Love To Visit

For the Broke and the Bookish’s Top Ten Tuesday:

December 5: Ten Bookish Settings I’d Love to Visit

I decided to keep this list to bookish settings that actually exist. So much as I’d like to visit Narnia, or Hogwarts, these can all be found on a map or globe. Also I decided it to limit to places where I’ve never been (yet).

1. Prince Edward Island, Canada as seen in the work of LM Montgomery– I’ve loved the work on LM Mongomery since I was a child and Prince Edward Island is a character that is consistent in her work. It sounds beautiful. It looks beautiful based on the pictures that I’ve seen. It’s definitely on my literary travel list!

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“…the Lake of Shining Waters was blue — blue — blue; not the changeful blue of spring, nor the pale azure of summer, but a clear, steadfast, serene blue, as if the water were past all modes and tenses of emotion and had settled down to a tranquillity unbroken by fickle dreams.”
― L.M. Montgomery, Anne of the Island

2. Scotland as seen in the work of Diana Gabaldon, The Lymond Chronicles by  Dorothy Dunnett, To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf, Lady of the Glen by Jennifer Roberson,  the  Too Deep for Tears trilogy by Katheryn Lynne Davis, Island of the Swans by Ciji Ware- I’ve read a lot of books set in Scotland, that draw on the rich history and beautiful landscape. My third grade teacher was Scottish and had what sounded like the coolest accent to me at the time. In some ways it seems that Scotland is an enchanted fairy land more than a real place to me! But I do know people who have been there and assure me it’s real, and that while there are certainly the fantasy places that are described in books, there are many normal places too.

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“The sigh of all the seas breaking in measure round the isles soothed them; the night wrapped them; nothing broke their sleep, until, the birds beginning and the dawn weaving their thin voices in to its whiteness”
― Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse

3. Cornwall, England as seen in the work of Daphne DuMaurier– The cliff-side mansion in Rebecca. The smugglers hideout in Jamaica Inn, the pirates of Frenchman’s Creek. Cornwall is a place of mystery, danger and romance in my eyes, thanks in large part to Daphne DuMaurier.

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“The peace of Manderley. The quietude and the grace. Whoever lived within its walls, whatever trouble there was and strife, however much uneasiness and pain, no matter what tears were shed, what sorrows borne, the peace of Manderley could not be broken or the loveliness destroyed. The flowers that died would bloom again another year, the same birds build their nests, the same trees blossom. That old quiet moss smell would linger in the air, and the bees would come, and crickets, the herons build their nests in the deep dark woods. The butterflies would dance their merry jug across the lawns, and spiders spin foggy webs, and small startled rabbits who had no business to come trespassing poke their faces through the crowded shrubs. There would be lilac, and honeysuckle still, and the white magnolia buds unfolding slow and tight beneath the dining-room window. No one would ever hurt Manderley. It would lie always in its hollow like an enchanted thing, guarded by the woods, safe, secure, while the sea broke and ran and came again in the little shingle bays below.”

4. The Yorkshire Moors, England as seen in the work of the Bronte sisters, and The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgden Burnett

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‘And what are those golden rocks like when you stand under them?’ she once asked.

The abrupt descent of Penistone Crags particularly attracted her notice; especially when the setting sun shone on it and the topmost heights, and the whole extent of landscape besides lay in shadow. I explained that they were bare masses of stone, with hardly enough earth in their clefts to nourish a stunted tree.

‘And why are they bright so long after it is evening here?’ she pursued.

‘Because they are a great deal higher up than we are,’ replied I; ‘you could not climb them, they are too high and steep. In winter the frost is always there before it comes to us; and deep into summer I have found snow under that black hollow on the north-east side!’

-Wuthering Heights- Emily Bronte

“Listen to th’ wind wutherin’ round the house,” she said. “You could bare stand up on the moor if you was out on it tonight.”
Mary did not know what “wutherin'” meant until she listened, and then she understood. It must mean that hollow shuddering sort of roar which rushed round and round the house, as if the giant no one could see were buffeting it and beating at the walls and windows to try to break in. But one knew he could not get in, and somehow it made one feel very safe and warm inside a room with a red coal fire.”
― Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden

5. Paris, France as seen in Notre Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo, The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery, A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens- Yes, I am very aware that these are books that depict very different era’s in Paris’ history. Of the three the Paris in The Elegance of the Hedgehog is probably most like the Paris I’d visit today. But I also know that the Cathedral de Notre Dame , still stands, with it’s gargoyles even if Quasimodo isn’t hiding among them. And there are still shades of the reign of terror that Dickens depicted.  I’ve read about Paris in a lot of other books too. Books set in occupied Paris during WWII. Books depicting la belle epoque. In some ways that convergence of beauty and violence is what makes the city seem so appealing to me.

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“Admirable, however, as the Paris of the present day appears to you, build up and put together again in imagination the Paris of the fifteenth century; look at the light through that surprising host of steeples, towers, and belfries; pour forth amid the immense city, break against the points of its islands, compress within the arches of the bridges, the current of the Seine, with its large patches of green and yellow, more changeable than a serpent’s skin; define clearly the Gothic profile of this old Paris upon an horizon of azure, make its contour float in a wintry fog which clings to its innumerable chimneys; drown it in deep night, and observe the extraordinary play of darkness and light in this sombre labyrinth of buildings; throw into it a ray of moonlight, which shall show its faint outline and cause the huge heads of the towers to stand forth from amid the mist; or revert to that dark picture, touch up with shade the thousand acute angles of the spires and gables, and make them stand out, more jagged than a shark’s jaw, upon the copper-coloured sky of evening. Now compare the two.”

-Notre Dame de Paris by Victor Hugo

“I see a beautiful city and a brilliant people rising from this abyss, and, in their struggles to be truly free, in their triumphs and defeats, through long years to come, I see the evil of this time and of the previous time of which this is the natural birth, gradually making expiation for itself and wearing out…”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

6. Barcelona, Spain as seen in The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon- The Barcelona seen in this novel is a twisty, Gothic place full of hidden secrets. In other words, it’s the kind of place I could really go for! Sure Zafon claims that some locations from the novel such as the rambling Hospice of Santa Lucia or the mysterious Cemetery of Forgotten Books are fictional, but it seems like the kind of place where one might turn a corner and unexpectedly find something strange and beautiful.gothic-quarter-barcelona

“Before we knew it, we were walking along the breakwater until the whole city, shining with silence, speak out at our feet like the greatest mirage in the universe, emerging from the pool of the harbor waters. We sat on the edge of the jetty to gaze at the sight.

“This city is a sorceress, you know, Daniel? It gets under your skin and steals your soul without you knowing it.”

-The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

7. The Greek Islands as seen in The Magus by John Fowles- The book’s setting, the island of Phraxos, is technically fictional. But the author based it on his time on the real Greek island of Spetses, so I think it still counts for this list. The island that Fowles describes is beautiful and mysterious and isolated. It’s the kind of place where it’s easy to be overwhelmed and see menace hidden in the beauty. That’s certainly what happens to our narrator, Nicholas Urfe, in the novel. But since his sanity is open to debate, I think it’s also the kind of place where I might enjoy going and getting away from it all.

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“The lifeless sea was ruffled here and there by a lost zephyr, by a stippling shoal of sardines, dark ash-blue lines that snaked, broad then narrow, in slow motion across the shimmering mirageous surface, as if the water was breeding corruption.”

-The Magus by John Fowles

8. India as seen in The Far Pavillions by MM Kaye- Actually, I think that parts of this novel also take place in what is now Pakistan and Afghanistan. While it’s set in the 19th century the beautiful mountains stand out to me as a strong setting. It’s what I remember most about the book, and what I’d most love to see if I ever visit that part of the world. 10717253

“They rode out together from the shadows of the trees, leaving the Bala Hissar and the glowing torch of the burning Residency behind them, and spurred away across the flat lands towards the mountains…
And it may even be that they found their Kingdom.”
― M.M. Kaye, The Far Pavilions

9. Egypt as seen in The Map of Love by Ahdaf Soueif- When I was a kid I think I imagined Egypt as being desert, pyramids, sphinxes, and mummies walking around wrapped in toilet paper (in retrospect I think my childhood perception of Egypt might have been largely based on an episode of Scooby Doo). The Egypt that this book depicts has none of that. Well, we do see desert and pyramids, but  we also see cities and the Nile. It makes Egypt seem like a vivid place that’s almost breathes and has a pulse.

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“Fields and more fields on either side of the road.From where they are it looks as if the whole world were green.But from higher up,from a hill-if there were a hill in this flat country-or from a pyramid(one of the many that two thousand years ago lined this route from Thebes to Memphis,from the Delta to the Cataract)or from an aeroplane today,you would be able to see how narrow the strip green was,how closely it clung to the winding river.The river like a lifeline thrown across the desert, the villages and the town hanging on to it, clustering together, glancing over their shoulders at the desert always behind them.Appeasing it,finally,by making it the dwelling of their head.”
― Ahdaf Soueif, The Map of Love

10. Ireland as seen in the novels of Maeve Binchy, Cecelia Ahern, Marian Keyes, the Exit Unicorn series by Cindy Brandner, The Mermaid’s Singing by Lisa Carey- In some ways I think if Ireland in a way similar to Scotland; full of myths and lore. But I’ve also read enough Irish work set in contemporary times to have a better sense of what it is today. I’d still like to go, because I think that the richness of the lore pervades a place.

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But the sea, despite its allure, is not our destination. For we seek land- a land of myth and madness, of poets and politicians, rebels and raconteurs, of blood and brotherhood. A land unlike any other, half legend, half truth, wholly and terribly beautiful.

We fly through the night, until we see a line on the horizon, and we feel the relief of homecoming after such a very long voyage, after the faceless ocean undulating eternally beneath us. And so here we arrive, to the edge of a country of limestone cliffs, soft-faced with moss and nesting gulls . In we fly across a patchwork quilt of a thousand shades of green and low stone walls, with sheep dotting the dawn’s landscape. But do not let this enchantment fool you, for this is a land that has known much pain, whose fields are watered well and deep with blood. This is an old land, and our people have lived here long, some saying we were the small dark ones that dwelled in the trees, before the coming of the Celts, but we are older even than them. We knew this land before man, before God, before light.

-Flights of Angels by Cindy Brandner

11. Florence, Italy as seen in The Light in the Piazza by Elizabeth Spencer, A Room with a View by EM Forster- Florence in these books seems more alive than other places. It’s a place where people are able to get away from social notions of respectability, and really get in touch with their feelings.

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“It was pleasant to wake up in Florence, to open the eyes upon a bright bare room, with a floor of red tiles which look clean though they are not; with a painted ceiling whereon pink griffins and blue amorini sport in a forest of yellow violins and bassoons. It was pleasant, too, to fling wide the windows, pinching the fingers in unfamiliar fastenings, to lean out into sunshine with beautiful hills and trees and marble churches opposite, and, close below, Arno, gurgling against the embankment of the road.”

Top Ten Tuesday: Book Boyfriends

For the Broke and the Bookish’s Top Ten Tuesday:

October 3: Top Ten Book Boyfriends/Girlfriends (Which characters do you have crushes on?)

Ah book boyfriends. They make up the vast majority of boyfriends for me. They’ve broken my heart and put it back together again. There are some notable omissions on here. I didn’t include Heathcliff because his sociopathic tendencies are sort of a turn off for me. I also didn’t include Mr. Rochester because, while I do ship him with Jane the whole “I forgot to tell you I’m already married” thing at the wedding would have been a deal breaker for me (though I’m glad it wasn’t for Jane). There are also a few that appealed to me once but don’t so much any more. And of course a few are sort of embarrassing.

51z5jz2frjl-_ac_us218_1. Peter Pan from Peter Pan by JM Barrie- Yes I was a little kid when this crush ruled. I loved Peter Pan in all his incarnations. Like him, I never saw the appeal of adulthood. He had this whole world for himself, with a tribe of friends around all the time. He had enough danger to keep things exciting, a devoted fairy friend and the ability to fly. What’s not to love as a kid? But even when I was very young I sensed some sadness from him. While the idea of eternal childhood, free of adult supervision appealed to me, I was also somewhat aware that it wasn’t quite right. There comes a time when all kids- even those who can fly, need structure, family and stability. Peter didn’t have that. Even the eternal childhood that I envied had something “off” about it. Because childhood is only one part of life. To stay in it, is to deny the rest of what life has to offer. Children are very future oriented and Peter Pan lived in a perpetual present. Of course this gave him a bit of a tragic element, which only made me love him more.

There could not have been a lovelier sight; but there was none to see it except a little boy who was staring in at the window. He had ecstasies innumerable that other children can never know; but he was looking through the window at the one joy from which he must be for ever barred.

511prxozevl-_ac_us218_2. Jeremy Dragon from Here’s to You Rachel Robinson by Judy Blume- Jeremy’s actual last name is Kravtiz but a jacket makes him known as Jeremy Dragon to the title character and her friends. And “Dragon” sort of suits him better. A dragon is a mysterious, dangerous, fantasy. As is the cutest guy in middle school, for Rachel Robinson, a gifted and talented “good girl”. As a result she doesn’t really consider him as a real life option. She does have a crush on an older man however. But when that reveals itself to be a dead end, it turns out that Jeremy is interested in Rachel. I don’t know why this character, and this element of the story resonated with me so much. It was probably a bit of a wish fulfillment fantasy. I saw bits of myself in the goody goody Rachel. So her shock that Jeremy might see her as something other than awkward was similar to my own. I don’t know if that means that the story line was well developed, or just that it did its job in making pre-teen Fran swoon.

“Just when you think life is over, you find out it’s not. Just when you think you’re never going to fall for someone else, it happens without any warning! I hope this doesn’t means I’m… jumping from Obstacle to the next. I don’t think it does. I don’t think it means anything except life is full of surprises and they’re not necessarily bad.”

51kc21bqngl-_ac_us218_3. Gilbert Blythe from the Anne series by LM Montgomery- When Gilbert first meets Anne Shirley in school, he teases her about her red hair, calling her carrots. In return she breaks a slate over his head. Great romances often have rough beginnings! Over the years, Gilbert apologizes and he and Anne become friends. Gilbert wants more, but Anne dreams of a knight in shining armor. It’s not until some later that she comes to realize that her knight in shining armor might just be her kind, supportive friend. And that her romance with him might be better than anything she could have dreamed up! Gilbert sees Anne both as the girl she was and the woman she becomes and he loves both: the awkward and the graceful.

Gilbert stretched himself out on the ferns beside the Bubble and looked approvingly at Anne. If Gilbert had been asked to describe his ideal woman the description would have answered point for point to Anne, even to those seven tiny freckles whose obnoxious presence still continued to vex her soul. Gilbert was as yet little more than a boy; but a boy has his dreams as have others, and in Gilbert’s future there was always a girl with big, limpid gray eyes, and a face as fine and delicate as a flower.

-From Anne of Avonlea (Book 2 of the Anne series)

41rryji1bvl-_ac_us218_4. Romeo Montague from Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare was my literary crush when I was about twelve or thirteen. I eventually outgrew this one. But I always felt that those who accused Romeo of being fickle were misreading the text- I still do. Romeo’s initial infatuation with Rosaline isn’t supposed to tell us his love for Juliet isn’t true. Just the opposite. It’s supposed to tell us that this isn’t a boyish infatuation; he’s already had that. When he meets Juliet his language changes significantly, and he begins speaking in elegant poetry. That indicates that love has brought him to greater sophistication. As for love at first sight, no I don’t really believe in it (I do think people can fall in love quickly but perhaps not that quickly!). But I don’t believe in ghosts or witches either and their presence doesn’t keep my from believing the characters in Hamlet or Macbeth! Plus, who wouldn’t want to be the woman who inspires a man to speak like this?

O! she doth teach the torches to burn bright
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
Like a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear;
Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear.

51xphws9jdl-_ac_us218_5. Jamie Fraser from the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon- A lot of people who list Jamie as a literary crush argue that he’s perfect. I’m including him here because he’s far from it. He’s got flaws, and not just the kind that the writer threw in because someone told her that characters can’t be perfect. His flaws are as much a part of who he is as his strengths, and sometimes they’re one and the same. His stubbornness makes him act like a jerk at times; but it also makes him as devoted as one can possibly be to his loved ones. At times his views of women come off as old fashioned, which is also good: an 18th century hero who talks like he just finished reading Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinham wouldn’t ring true. But whatever he might say and whatever mistakes he makes, he’s still the 18th century guy who saw a crazy lady running around in her underwear, spewing foul language, and skillfully providing healthcare and fell hard.

When the day shall come, that we do part,” he said softly, and turned to look at me, “if my last words are not ‘I love you’—ye’ll ken it was because I didna have time.”

-From The Fiery Cross (Book 5 of the Outlander series)

51omzinvtpl-_ac_us218_6. Alexander Belov Barrington from The Bronze Horseman series by Paullina Simons though I might break up with him after something he pulled in The Summer Garden… I overlook it here only because that whole part of the book seemed very out of character to me. In the first two books (and through most of the third) Alexander is the brave, stubborn, devoted man who brings you ice cream. That’s the dream isn’t it?  Well Alexander has a temper, and sometimes sees things as black and white, when they’re not. But that’s balanced by a strong sense of right and wrong, and a willingness to sometimes do the wrong thing for the right reasons, and vice versa.

“Tatiana…you and I had only one moment…” said Alexander. “A single moment in time, in your time and mine…one instant, when another life could have still been possible.” He kissed her lips. “Do you know what I’m talking about?”
When Tatiana looked up from her ice cream, she saw a soldier staring at her from across the street.
“I know that moment,” whispered Tatiana.”

41gwjpjhljl-_ac_us218_7. Gabriel Oak from Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy- Gabriel Oak is a farmer. He works his land, and he works hard. He’s reliable and has common sense. He proposes to Bathsheba Everdine early in this novel and is refused. He remains her loyal friend throughout. Even when she is acting impulsive or unwise, Gabriel never wavers in his devotion. When Bathsheba eventually realizes what she gave up when she turned down Oak’s proposal, he doesn’t gloat. He doesn’t tell her to get lost. He is simply happy because the woman he loves wants him. The life that he wants with her is simple:

And at home by the fire, whenever you look up there I shall be— and whenever I look up, there will be you.

51zpob-ijil-_ac_us218_

 

8. Sir Francis Crawford of Lymond from the Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett- Though his spot on the list might be temporary. In the first two books he earned his place on here, but I haven’t read the rest of the series yet. He might break my heart. Lymond is  a difficult character to describe because it’s hard to get to know him. He’s handsome. He’s incredibly smart. He speaks a number of languages and is extremely well read. He’s generally good at fighting and intrigues. But we spend most of the books seeing him from other people’s points of view. That makes him intriguing as a literary crush! But as I said, I’m only two books into the series. I might learn something I don’t like!

Considering Lymond, flat now on the bed in wordless communion with the ceiling, Richard spoke. “My dear, you are only a boy. You have all your life still before you.”

On the tortoise-shell bed, his brother did not move. But there was no irony for once in his voice when he answered. “Oh, yes, I know. The popular question is, For what?”

-From Queens Play (Book 2 of the Lymond chronicles)

419ewleob1l-_ac_us218_9. Fitzwilliam Darcy from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen- the only Austen hero to make my list (I like a few others two but there were reasons they didn’t make it on the list) seems like someone you could potentially be happy with. We get to know him first through his faults; pride (and prejudice!), stuffiness, a tendency to be judgmental. But when we get to know the other side to his personality- loyalty, a fundamental sense of decency, honesty, we get a fuller picture of whole person.

In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

51nbhw4ql8l-_ac_us218_10. Carl Brown from Joy in the Morning by Betty Smith- In 1927 Carl and Annie fall in love and get married. Most books would end there, but that’s where this one starts. Carl is a second year law student. Annie left school at the age of 14 to work and support her family. Right away the couple face financial difficulties. Carl’s work and his studies keep him busy. Annie is very intelligent and an avid reader, but isn’t well educated, and feels awkward and a bit uncomfortable in a university setting. Even when he doesn’t always understand where Annie is coming from, Carl always loves her. When things get difficult her doesn’t regret his decision to marry her. He never wavers in the certainty that this is who he is supposed to spend his life with.