Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Should Get TV/Film Adaptations

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

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August 18: Books that Should be Adapted into Netflix Shows/Movies (submitted by Nushu @ Not A Prima Donna Girl)

Just a note that I don’t limit this to Netflix. Anyone who wants can make these movies/shows.

  1. 91ewbiftngl._ac_uy218_The Secret History by Donna Tartt– I think that if it’s done right, a film adaptation of this novel would be an exercise in creating dramatic tension. The viewer would stay with the limited point of view of Richard, the protagonist, so that we can only know what he knows and see what we sees. It would be frustrating, yes, but deliciously so, just like in the book.
  2. 41xfknijvel-_ac_us218_Villette by Charlotte Bronte– While I love Jane Eyre, it’s been adapted enough. Let’s give some of Charlotte Bronte’s other work a shot! This also has mystery and romance, and I think some of the Gothic/supernatural(?) scenes have the potential to look great on screen.
  3. 51lcp5zpnnl._ac_uy218_A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray– The Victorian Gothic setting combined with secret societies, magic, coming of age drama and romance makes me wonder why this hasn’t been adapted before! Ideally I think I’d want a series with one book per season.
  4. 91jgf9xfe0l._ac_uy218_The Luxe by Anna Godbersen– Set in New York City at the turn of the 20th century, this would look just lovely onscreen. The plot involves friendship, backstabbing, forbidden romance and betrayal. It would be a wonderful guilty pleasure to watch with a talented cast. Again I think this lends itself to series format with one book per season.
  5. a1d-o9itg-l._ac_uy218_Night Film by Marisha Pessl– Yes, this would turn into a bit of challenge because elements in the book are ambiguous. Film is a more concrete medium and there would certainly be the temptation to give the viewer answers. But other films have handled ambiguity well, so it can be done. I also think the films within the book could be turned into some great films within a film. How a director chooses to interpret those (via casting, visuals, etc) could really say a lot about the events in the story.
  6. 911-t2bi6l._ac_uy218_The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon– I think setting (post war Spain) can lend itself  to some great visuals. The plot, complete with mystery and forbidden love, would easily hold viewers attention. Other books in the Cemetery of the Forgotten series could be done as follow ups (I’m thinking 2-3 episodes per books, so the whole show could be 4 seasons of mini-series, if that makes sense)
  7. 91vfadbawnl._ac_uy218_The Gods of Gotham by Lyndsay Faye– I think that this would appeal the the same audiences that are fans of The Alienist and Gangs of New York. We get the corrupt, constantly changing melting pot of 19th century, a compelling hero in Timothy Wilde, and two sequels that serve to make later seasons on a TV series.  Given the (rightful) scrutiny that many police forces are coming under, a look at the roots of the NYPD (good, bad and ugly) could be timely. The story deals with a murder mystery, social issues, family drama, and historical elements.
  8. 81ku7zgvnzl._ac_uy218_Kindred by Octavia Butler– This has a lot to recommend it. It’s an exciting time travel story about a woman trying to ensure that her family is able to exist. That time travel story brings her (and her white husband) to a southern plantation, where they must pretend to be a master and his slave in order to survive. There are a lot of moral dilemmas here too, that can provoke thought and conversation in audiences.
  9. 81q2madzv9l._ac_uy218_ml3_Doomesday Book by Connie Willis– This is actually the only Oxford Time Travel book I’ve read (To Say Nothing of the Dog is sitting on my shelf waiting for me to start it!) but I think that the series could do well on TV. Since there is a common universe (as opposed to characters) they could have a different creative team each season and really mix it up a little bit.
  10. 71rl3ufz0wl._ac_uy218_Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee– This is probably going to be an unpopular opinion but I think that this could be a great and perhaps necessary look at how racism shows up in people who we don’t usually think of as “racist.” To most people (including his daughter) Atticus Fitch is the epitome of a good man. So when she finds out about her father’s racist sympathies Scout is crushed, and tries to reconcile this knowledge with the man she loves. She also looks at her own behavior and the assumptions that she’s always made. I think a lot of people are starting to realize how deeply entrenched racism is in society. This book looks at how it hides even in “good” people, and what happens when heroes are toppled. That’s something that people need to see, even if, (especially if) it’s uncomfortable.

Unpopular Literary Opinions

  • 41rryji1bvl-_ac_us218_A lot of contemporary interpretations of Romeo and Juliet misunderstand the play completely.
    • If they don’t believe in love at first sight, they dismiss they entire play. OK, Macbeth opens with witches. Hamlet meets a ghost. Do you say “witches/ghosts don’t exist, so clearly this play offers nothing of value”?  Why should love, at first sight, be any different?
    • They say Romeo is fickle because he thought he was in love with another girl prior to meeting Juliet. But if you look at the poetry, Romeo’s language, once he meets Juliet, becomes more sophisticated. This indicates that it’s the real thing. So why include that other girl at all? Well, it’s Shakespeare telling us that this isn’t a childish infatuation because Romeo’s had that and it looked different.
    • They claim that Romeo and Juliet were two immature teens who didn’t really understand love or life. IRL, of course, a couple in their early teens wouldn’t understand true love. But for the sake of the play, we need to accept that this is a “perfect” love. It’s meant to be. Then we see the tragedy of what happens to a perfect love in a world filled with hate.
  • 511jzqi9ekl-_ac_us218_In Little Women Jo made the right romantic choices. She and Laurie would have been a disaster as a couple. They’re way too similar in terms of personality and they’d have clashed all the time. Jo also had a deep love for her family and defined herself in terms of her sisters. Laurie also loved her family, and saw Jo as sort of the “Lead March Sister.” In other words, the way he saw her was exactly the way she saw herself. He didn’t challenge her perceptions at all. Bhaer knew and cared for Jo independent of her family.
  • 51tt9v9vjl-_ac_us218_Wuthering Heights is not a romance. A love story, perhaps, but not a romance. And really it’s just as much a “hate story” as it is a “love story.” Even with the two characters who get a happy romantic ending, we’re ultimately left wondering if it was worth it. Lowood observes Cathy and Hareton together and grumbles “‘They are afraid of nothing…Together, they would brave Satan and all his legions.'” Then he walks back and in the churchyard sees “the three headstones on the slope next the moor: the middle one grey, and half buried in the heath; Edgar Linton’s only harmonized by the turf and moss creeping up its foot; Heathcliff’s still bare.” The implication is that the price of Cathy and Hareton’s happiness is those three graves.
  • I think of John Green as a YA version of Nicholas Sparks. Which is fine if you like that, but I don’t really. I like his vlogs and persona but I feel like as a writer he doesn’t do anything that hasn’t been done before.
  • 51xipv5h1l-_ac_us218_I actually think that Go Set A Watchman enriched To Kill A Mockingbird and the characters. I much prefer to see Atticus Finch as a flawed human being rather than a perfect white savior. It makes sense that as a child, Scout perceives her father as a hero. And it makes sense that as an adult she’s able to see him as he is: a person with strengths and weaknesses and prejudices. It also makes sense for Atticus’ racism to come out in the way that it does. When an innocent man is accused of a crime that he didn’t commit, Atticus defends him, because a) it’s his job and b) people shouldn’t be held responsible for things that they didn’t do. But twenty years later, when civil rights are becoming a major issue, it seems believable that Atticus, who grew up in a segregated world where the power was squarely in the laps of white males, might begin to feel threatened. He fears to lose the privilege that’s been his all his life.
  • I like the Ron/Hermione pairing in Harry Potter. They’ve got the whole opposites attract thing going for them. They balance each other out. But I always felt like the Ginny/Harry pairing was just so that Harry wasn’t left romantically alone at the end of the series.51iosghk0l-_ac_us218_
  • 41rrzplmctl-_ac_us218_Rupi Kaur has yet to really impress me as a poet. I know a lot of people find her really relatable and I don’t want to diminish that. I think it’s wonderful when people have that response to something, even if I don’t share it. Especially since I can see why they relate to it. A lot of the themes that Kaur addresses in her work are universal. But I feel that, with a few exceptions, she doesn’t address them in an innovative or artful, or skillful way. My problem was that there is enough potential in the work for me to wish it was better.
  • I don’t particularly care for Jasper Fforde’s Thursday Next books. I know that a literary detective in a futuristic world who goes inside books sounds like it should be right up my alley. I tried the first three books in the series but they just left me cold.
  • Stephen King is underrated from a literary point of view. He’s seen as a purely commercial writer. Yes, he’s written his share of trash, but when he gets it right, he really touches on our societies secrets, fears, and shame.

Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Lived Up To The Hype

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday

July 31: Popular Books that Lived Up to the Hype

When a book is really hyped I tend to get nervous. There have been many times when a book resonates with the public a lot and just falls flat for me (Think Twilight, The Notebook, The DaVinci Code…).  But that said, these lived up to the acclaim

51-eyayn0ol-_ac_us218_1. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern– When this book came out it got a lot of praise, but I think that my expectations going into it were still low. I expected it to be overhyped. I was pleasantly surprised for the most part. Yes, there were some elements of the plot that didn’t completely work for me, but I found the writing lovely and the atmosphere wonderful.

 

51lsfidqpl-_ac_us218_2. Room by Emma Donoghue– Fortunately I read this pre-hype, not long after it was released. I think I read the whole thing in about a day because I couldn’t put it down! Not long after that, it started getting a lot of acclaim, which I felt like it deserved.

 

 

 

41qxofoqbxl-_ac_us218_3. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime by Mark Hadden– I forget what made me read this book. I was in college at the time and in my own little campus bubble, so I wasn’t all that aware of the hype around it. But that allowed me to come to it fresh and appreciate it for its own merits.

 

 

51jb19dy-ul-_ac_us218_4. Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding– I was skeptical of this one for a while. It had been popular for a while before I read it. I think I initially held off based on my general aversion to popular things. But the thing that made decide to pick it up was when I heard it was an adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.

 

 

51muf7bj-ll-_ac_us218_5. The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss– Several people had recommended this to me before I finally picked it up. I had low expectations in spite of the hype because I tend to be fussy about fantasy as a genre and the fact that it was very long made be a bit wary. It was also compared to a few books that I didn’t really enjoy. But I was pleasantly surprised.

 

51xipv5h1l-_ac_us218_6. Go Tell A Watchman by Harper Lee– I’m probably one of the few people who did feel like this was worth the hype. Maybe it was a greedy move by the publisher but I found it an interesting companion piece to To Kill A Mockingbird. I think they way that Atticus was depicted makes sense. A lot of people’s racism comes out when they see a marginalized group leaving the niche that they once had, and becoming part of the mainstream discourse. And Scout’s awareness of her father’s racism also made sense because as an adult, she’s able to see him as a fallible human being rather than a hero.

51q2yi-diil-_ac_us218_7. The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin– My biggest problem with this books was the way it was structured. It’s about four siblings who are told the date of their deaths by a fortune teller. The rest of the book is divided into four parts: one per each child. The problem was that the first two parts were by far the most interesting! But in spite of that, I liked the way the book suggested that the deaths of some of these characters were a self-fulfilling prophecy.

51dvs6wngbl-_ac_us218_8. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak– By the time I got around to reading this one, it had been praised very highly. I was sort of expecting it to be the kind of emotionally manipulative thing that I often resent. But instead, it was poignant and heartbreaking.

 

 

51ozv7qacul-_sx260_9. Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon– I started reading this series in college. I’d seen it recommended in a lot of places, for fans of other books that I’ve enjoyed, but I was always a bit skeptical. One of my friends in college said that I’d like it, so I finally decided to give it a try. I’m glad I did!

 

 

51iosghk0l-_ac_us218_10. Harry Potter series by JK Rowling– I think the first Harry Potter book came out when I was a pre-teen, but I didn’t read it then. I actually held off on the series until college, based on the logic that something that popular had to be total crap. But I finally decided to give it a shot and was surprised to learn that popular books can (sometimes!) be good.