Top Ten Tuesday: Books For Which I’ve Wanted Read Alikes

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

June 8: Books I Loved that Made Me Want More Books Like Them (The wording is weird here, so if you have a better way to say this please let me know! What I’m thinking is… you read a book and immediately wanted more just like it, perhaps in the same genre, about the same topic or theme, by the same author, etc. For example, I once read a medical romance and then went to find more because it was so good. The same thing happened to me with pirate historical romances and romantic suspense.)

For this one, I decided to make things a bit interesting. If a book has TV/film adaptations it’s not allowed on this list, because it’s too popular (and popular books always have imitators!). So this is also turning into a bit of a list of books that I’m surprised don’t have adaptations! I’m also sharing some of the read alikes I’ve found for the books on this list.

1.The Secret History by Donna Tartt– Actually now that I think of it, I’m surprised that Hollywood hasn’t tried to adapt this one. Apparently the rights have been sold but nothing come of it. I’m sure it’s coming eventually, and I can only hope they do it justice. Anyway, after Some read alikes are The Lake of Dead Languages by Carol Goodman and Red Leaves by Paullina Simons.

2. The Quincunx by Charles Palliser– This is another book I’m surprised no one’s tried to adapt yet. I think a miniseries format might work best. Though I’m sure it would be a difficult task. It’s actually part book, part puzzle, which is why it’s so hard to find read alikes for. Some read alikes (in different ways) include The Meaning of Night and The Glass of Time by Michael Cox and Fingersmith by Sarah Waters (which was ineligible for it’s own spot on this list due to two adaptations)

3, The Eight by Katherine Neville– Actually someone in Hollywood really need to check out this list because I have wonderful source material for them! This book does have a sequel but I haven’t read it yet. I want to reread the first one before I read it. Actually some of the other books on this list, including The Gargoyle and The Shadow of the Wind make decent read alikes. Also, Amy Benson’s Plague Tales trilogy.

4. The Gargoyle by Andrew Davidson- The Eight (see above) is actually not a bad read alike for this one. Another one is The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova (which had the film rights sold in 2005 apparently but no word on whether it’s ever actually happening!). The similarities are more in terms of tone than plot.

5. The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon- My quest for read alikes for this one led me the rest of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books series. It also led me to Diane Setterfield’s The Thirteenth Tale (which couldn’t make this list due to the adaptation) which sent me on yet another quest for more read alikes.

6. The Stolen Child by Keith Donohue– Read alikes include Donohue’s The Boy Who Drew Monsters, and The Changeling by Victor LaValle. Even though the target audiences are very different I might also say that Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book, and even JM Barrie’s Peter Pan are similar.

7. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern– There are rumors of a film adaptation of this one. I’m sure there will be one at some point, but for now it works for this list. Read alikes include The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern and Nights at the Circus by Angela Carter.

8. Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier– Sent me on a quest to read everything else Marillier has written or will write. That includes the rest of the Sevenwaters series. Other non-Marillier read alikes include Bitter Greens by Kate Forsyth, Katherine Arden’s Winternight trilogy and Robin McKinley’s folktale series.

9. A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray– Again the rest of the trilogy is an obvious read alike. Others include Carol Goodman’s Blythewood trilogy and Bray’s The Diviners series.

#WyrdAndWonder Challenge Catch up (Part II)

For Wyrd & Wonder’s Challenge

May 12Desert island reads

Eight (audio)books, one movie franchise or TV show and a luxury item – what are you taking? (fantasy choices only this month please!)

See my answers here
May 13Had me at hello

Amazing cover art or a perfect pitch – a book you wanted to read before you even saw the synopsis (or where you immediately NEEDED to read the synopsis because your interest had been piqued)

Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley- The pitch describes it as ” is described as “Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber.” I haven’t’ read it yet (it only came out earlier this year) but I really need to read this like, yesterday!
May 14Fantasy voices from around the world

Fridays are all about celebrating fantasy from around the world – this week focuses on the authors rather than the setting (non US / UK born; bonus points for also non US / UK resident)

Recently someone in my book club read The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna. She had a mixed reaction to it, but some of what she said made me think it might be an interesting read, regardless. Forna was born in Sierra Leone. She moved to the US as a child due to political instability.
May 15#StackSaturday

A few of my upcoming reads
May 16Page to screen

What dramatization of a fantasy read have you loved (movie, tv, play, radio – anything goes) – and/or what would you really like to see get made?

One of my favorite fantasy adaptations is Stardust, based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. This is one of the few cases where I actually like the movie better than the book.

I’d love to see a film/tv adaptation of Katherine Neville’s The Eight. I’d call it “light” fantasy in that it encompasses several other genres just as much/more than fantasy, but since it does include some fantasy (can’t say more than that without spoilers!) I’m counting it.
May 17Can’t wait to read

on your TBR or up and coming releases

On my immediate(ish) TBR
White As Snow by Tanith Lee
To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis
The Blue Girl by Charles DeLint
The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by VE Schwab
The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness
Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley
The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna
Harp of Kings by Juliet Marillier

Upcoming releases (there are millions, so I limited it to the next 2 months)
The Wolf and the Woodman by Ava Reid (publication June 8, 2021)
Honeycomb by Joanne M Harris (publication May 25, 2021)
The Hidden Palace (publication June 8, 2021)
The Nature of Witches (publication June 1, 2021)
For the Wolf by Hanna F. Whitten (publication June 1, 2021)
The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo
May 18With friends like these #TropeTuesday

Enemy to ally or otherwise unreliable / uncertain allies, backstabbing best friends… #TropeTuesday

Undead Girl Gang by Lily Anderson has some of both. When the heroine, Camila brings her BFF back from the dead, she’s hoping for the name of her friend’s killer and a chance to say goodbye. But she accidentally brings back two recently dead mean girls from her high school, as well. The girls have to work together to solve their murders, and become allies. Also Camila’s friend doesn’t always 100% appreciate being brought back,, so there’s some tension there.
May 19Who’s afraid of the suck fairy?

The suck fairy visits old favourites and removes their sparkle, leaving you wondering what Past You saw in this book when you reread it. Have you had a visit from the suck fairy / are there books you’re afraid to reread in case they’ve been visited by the suck fairy?

I’ve been wanting to reread Libba Bray’s Gemma Doyle series for a while. They have a special place in my heart, but I’m nervous about rereading due to fear of the “suck fairy.” But a friend of mine recently reread them and said they held up pretty well, so maybe I’ll brave it at some point soon.

Top Ten Tuesday: Numbers In the Titles

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday

ttt-new

October 1: Book Titles with Numbers In Them (You could really challenge yourself and do numbers 1-10 or just any numbers at all. Submitted by Emma @ Words and Peace)

One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

Three Blind Mice by Agatha Christie – I can’t remember if I read this one…

Tales of A Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume – Is this cheating because it’s “fourth” rather than “four”?

Five Children and It by E. Nesbit

Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid- Haven’t read it yet but it’s on my TBR

Seven For A Secret by Lyndsay Faye– Also on my TBR. It’s a sequel to  The Gods of Gotham.

The Eight by Katherine Neville

Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty– Never read this one but I’ve liked some of Moriarty’s other work so maybe I’ll put it on my TBR.

The Woman in Cabin Ten by Ruth Ware

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Red, White and Blue

For the That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

July 3: Books with Red, White, & Blue Covers (In honor of the 4th of July in the USA. Choose covers with your own country’s colors if you prefer!)

I went with a top nine this week so I could do three books for each color. And I’ve done a little shameless self-promotion on the last one. I promise I’ll try not to do that too often!

51ixaf4tmsl-_ac_us218_1. The Eight by Katherine Neville– In 1972, a computer expert, Cat Velis is sent to Algeria for a special assignment. She finds herself trying to unravel the mystery of the Montglane Service, a chess set that was gifted to Emperor Charlemagne from the Moors. Legend has it that the set holds the key to unlimited power. Two hundred years earlier, Mireille, a novice at Montglane Abbey must help her cousin Valentine disperse the pieces of the chess set before they fall into the wrong hands. The stories of Cat and Mireille intertwine in unexpected ways as they go about their similar goals, two hundred years apart. But the only way to stop the violence, conspiracy, and betrayal that follows the chess set, may be to unlock its dangerous secrets.

51myhqwnyyl-_ac_us160_2. The Rules Do Not Apply by Ariel Levy– In 2012, Ariel Levy left the US for a reporting trip to Mongolia. At the time, she was pregnant, married, financially secure, and had a successful career. A month later, she returned to the US and none of that was true anymore. Ariel Levy was raised to rebel against traditional gender roles. She was raised to believe that she could be anything. She built an unconventional life, that she was happy in. But nothing comes without a cost. Sometimes that cost is simply the result of bad luck. Sometimes it’s a result of bad decisions, and sometimes it comes from being blind to what we don’t want to see. For Ariel Levy, it was probably a combination of the three factors. But when your life falls apart, the only thing you can do is learn what you can from the experience, pick up the pieces, and keep going. To her credit, that’s what Levy did.

51d91qzjhsl-_ac_us218_3. The Casual Vacancy by JK Rowling– I decided to feature this book because I think I’m one of the few people who liked it. I guess one reason was that I wasn’t expecting anything like Harry Potter. Another is that I felt that even though the tone was bleak, it was appropriate for the material. It was billed as a dark comedy, but Rowling said that she thinks of it more as a “comic tragedy” and I think that’s a good description. Set in a suburban town called Pagford, the book begins with the death of a Parish Councillor. WIth his seat suddenly vacant, an election must take place. The candidates find their secrets come to like on the Parish Council online forum. These secrets pit rich against poor, husband against wife, one family against another. By the time the casual vacancy is resolved, Pagford may be forever changed.

519ak8fcsvl-_ac_us218_4. The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown– The Andreas family love to read. Their father, a Shakespearean scholar speaks almost entirely in verse named his three daughters after the Bard’s heroines. When their mother falls sick with breast cancer the three sisters return home to help out during her treatment. But they’ve got their own drama going on. Rosalind still lives in her hometown, and can’t quite keep her nose out of the rest of the family’s business. But it’s for the own good. Surely they can’t manage without her! Bianca is a NYC attorney whose need for the glamorous life may have left her with nothing. Cordelia is a flighty bohemian who has just realized that she’s pregnant that her carefree lifestyle will have to change. When they’re all under the same roof again, the Andreas girls fall into old patterns. But they also learn that coming together may be the way out of their problems.

41qfdmnyvxl-_ac_us218_5. The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls–  Rex and Rose Mary Wells had four children. Rex taught his children physics, geology and how to embrace life. He was also a destructive alcoholic. Rose Mary was an “excitement addict” who couldn’t bear to cook for her family when she could be painting a picture (after all the dinner will last for as long as it takes people to eat it, but art is forever). For the first six years of Jeanette’s life, they roamed around Arizona and California. But once the excitement of that life (and money) faded they retreated to West Virginia. Financial difficulties made Rex’s drinking worse and Jeannette and her siblings were often left to fend for themselves. But for all their parents’ many faults, they maintained a deep affection for them. In this memoir, Walls details how she and her siblings became successful despite the odds against them, and even pays tribute to her unconventional upbringing.

51aznmcwg9l-_ac_us218_6.  The White Album by Joan Didion- This book of essays by Joan Didion. It covers a variety of subjects but tends to center around California (and the US in general) in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s as a place of simultaneous paranoia and detachment. In the title essay, Didion describes her own psychological issues as well as her experience as a journalist covering the Black Panthers and the Manson trials.  Other essays in the volume cover subjects ranging from Doris Lessing and Georgia O’Keefe to the Hoover Dam and water in the desert. It’s interesting to look at what seemed to be a chaotic time in America from a contemporary perspective. While the tensions and threats of the late 1970’s/early 1970’s don’t quite seem quaint, I did have the impulse to tell the people “you ain’t seen nothing yet!” A few years ago I might have said that a lot of the things that made people nervous at that time were no longer huge issues, or were at least significantly better. Reading it now it’s hard to say whether we’re better or worse off.

51xphws9jdl-_ac_us218_7. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon– Nurse Claire Randall and her husband, Frank, were separated by WWII for most of their marriage.  After the war ends, in an effort to reconnect, they take a second honeymoon to Scotland. When Claire goes near a standing stone, she suddenly finds herself in Scotland circa 1743 facing Frank’s ancestor Jack Randall. Jack Randall is a sadistic bully who assaults her. To escape, Claire falls in with the Mackenzie clan. They take her to their home, where her medical skill is valued even though some suspect her of being a British spy. All Claire wants to do is go home. But Jack Randall is a powerful Redcoat, who wants Claire for his own purposes. The only way to avoid becoming his prisoner is to marry a Scot. Enter Jamie. Claire doesn’t know much about him other than the fact that he’s related to the Mackenzie’s but is not a member of the clan. He’s got a price his head and scars on his back (both thanks to Jack Randall) and he’s willing to marry her. Claire endures kidnapping and being tried as a witch, with the loyal, devoted Jamie always on her side. But when she finds herself before the standing stones once again, she’s forced to decide where she truly belongs.

41-f8aif5zl-_ac_us218_8. Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier- At a Confederate military hospital, Inman recovers from wounds sustained in battle. He’s tired of fighting for a cause in which he doesn’t believe, and he sneaks away from the hospital to return to his home, Cold Mountain, North Carolina, where his beloved Ada waits for him. Meanwhile, on Cold Mountain, Ada’s father has died, and Ada struggles to survive on the family farm, with the help of her friend Ruby. We follow Inman on his journey home, constantly threatened by the Confederate Home Guard who hunt down military deserters. We also follow the challenges that Ada and Ruby face on Cold Mountain. This novel mirrors Homer’s Odyssey as we see the soldier returning from war, and the faithful wife waiting for him. But in this case, Inman is not a victor but a deserter on the losing side, and Ada, though faithful, is very changed when Inman finally gets back.

51noohzpcsl-_ac_us218_9. Beautiful by Fran Laniado– Is this cheating? I don’t care if it is. This is my blog, and my novel is being published tomorrow, so I’m gonna plug it. So there!  Eimear is Faerie. She left the land of her birth,  to find a place where she felt like she could belong. She finds herself in the World, and she begins to build a life for herself. But when she encounters Finn, supernaturally beautiful but thoughtless and selfish, she gets angry. In a fit of rage, she casts a spell on Finn.  It’s a spell that she can’t undo, even when she discovers that she’s ruined Finn’s life. Finn is wealthy, arrogant,  and cruel. He didn’t think twice about insulting Eimear until it was too late.  Now, exiled from the only home he’s ever known, he is forced to make his own way, for the first time ever. He does have support- if he wants it. Eimear wants to assuage her guilt by helping him. In an isolated place, thrown together initially out of desperation and need, Eimear and Finn find a way to live together.  That alliance eventually blossoms into friendship, and even love. But before they can have their happily ever after, Eimear must go on a perilous journey that will force her to confront everything that she ran away from when she left Faerie.

 

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Best Dual Timeline Novels

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

February 20: Books I’ve Decided I’m No Longer Interested In Reading

This topic didn’t really speak to me. My thinking is that if I’m no longer interested in reading them, then why waste time writing about them? So instead I decided to look at one of my favorite fictional genres. I love dual timeline narratives in which the past and the present interact in some way. It could be a literal interaction; such as someone from the present having contact with someone in the past, or it could be more thematic- the present day character learns about some past event that illuminates something that s/he is experiencing. My “rules” for this list are that there isn’t allowed to be any literal time travel. Each character needs to remain physically in his/her own period. Visions of the other period are allowed though. Also, only two primary timelines are allowed. We can learn bits and pieces of what happens in between, but the main narrative focuses on two timelines. Here are ten favorites:

51pv4ly0mtl-_ac_us218_1. The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton– I was initially reluctant to read this after having been rather disappointed in Morton’s debut The House at Riverton. But I’m so glad that I gave her another chance because now she’s one of my favorite authors! This story starts off with a little girl, turning up abandoned on a ship from England to Australia in 1913. The only clue as to her identity is a book of fairy tales in her suitcase. Years later, her granddaughter, Cassandra, inherits a cottage in Cornwall, and journeys to England to discover the truth about her grandmother’s origins. She discovers that the key to the puzzle exists before her grandmother’s birth, with a Victorian country house full of family secrets. Friendship,  rivalry, betrayal, romance, and murder all play out in stories within stories. But even though the narrative is intricate (to say the least) it’s not hard to follow. Each chapter heading tells us exactly when and where the bit we’re reading takes place.

51iaiuahol-_ac_us218_2. Mariana by Susanna Kearsley– Susanna Kearsley has written many wonderful novels in this genre. For me, this one is a standout but anything she’s written is a reliable bet. Julia Beckett moves into an old farmhouse, one that she’d wanted to own since childhood. But when she moves in, she begins dreaming of Mariana, a British woman who lived in the house in the 17th century. Mariana loved her neighbor, Richard, a Loyalist, whose politics put him at odds with her uncle. Though their romance ended in tragedy, Mariana and Richard loved each other too much to stay separated. Their love will come full circle in the present day, and Julia will have an important role to play in the resolution.

51c-asvgcil-_ac_us218_3. The Thirteenth Tale by Diana Setterfield– Reclusive author, Vida Winter, has never told anyone the truth about her life story. When she’s old and ill, she hires Margaret Lea to write her biography. Margaret listens in fascination and disbelief as Vida tells her story of gothic weirdness. It’s complete with twins, a ghost, a governess, a fire, and a secret that’s never been shared. Margaret has her own issues with trust and intimacy, and her own past. Through listening to and telling Vida’s tale, she may find some resolution in her own life.

5160vyclkel-_ac_us218_4. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel– During a performance of King Lear, Arthur Leander, famous actor, has a heart attack onstage and dies despite the best efforts of an EMT in the audience. The EMT, Jeevan, later learns that on this same night the terrible flu began to spread. There is no cure, hospitals are flooded, and people begin to panic. Jeevan and his brother barricade themselves in his apartment as the world around them falls apart.  Fifteen years later, Kirsten, who as a small child appeared in that fateful production of King Lear, is an actress with the Travelling Symphony. This is a performing arts troupe that travels from one settlement of the ruined world to another. They perform Shakespeare and play music for the small communities of survivors because “survival is insufficient”- people need reminders of what it means to be human. When they arrive at St. Deborah by the Water and encounter a cult and a violent prophet who doesn’t let anyone leave. The book covers twenty years during which the twists of fate that link these disparate characters are revealed.

51lo8bgzurl-_ac_us218_5. The Plague Tales by Ann Benson– In 1348, a Spanish doctor  Alejandro Canches is tasked with keeping the court of Edward III alive during the plague. Nearly 700 years later, in a futuristic 2005 (the book was written in 1995 so 2005 was the future then!) Janie Crowe, a physician comes across a soil sample that contains a microbe that may unleash the bubonic plague on a post-Outbreak world that has already been decimated by disease. As the book progresses, these two separate stories of doctors fighting disease begin to intertwine in interesting ways. This book can be read as a standalone, or as the beginning of a trilogy. It’s followed by The Burning Road and The Physician’s Tale.

51iqjeozjvl-_ac_us218_6. A Cottage by the Sea by Ciji Ware– Blythe Barton was one married to a Hollywood power player. Then she walked in on him in bed with her sister. One messy divorce later, Blythe takes refuge in Cornwall, where she’s rented a cottage for the summer. She meets Lucas, the owner of the cottage that she’s renting. Jack is a widower, the father of a young son, who is trying to keep his estate going. Blythe wants to help. But she soon begins to have dreams and visions of Lucas’s ancestors. In the 18th century, the estate belonged to a woman, also named Blythe Barton. She was married, against her will, to a man named Christopher, though she loved his brother, Ennis. All three have tragic fates, but observing these historical events gives Blythe the perspective she needs to move on with her own life.

41xgjp2alkl-_ac_us218_7. The Weight of Water by Anita Shreve– In 1873, two women living on the Isles of Shoals, off the coast of New Hampshire, were found murdered. A third woman survived by hiding in a sea cave. In the present day, photojournalist Jean goes to the island with her husband, Thomas and their daughter Billie. The plan is for Jean to shoot a photo essay for a magazine about the murders. They take a boat with Thomas’ brother Rich and his girlfriend, Adelaine. As Jean is drawn into the murders that happened so long ago, Thomas and Adelaide are drawn to each other. All of the characters, in both timelines, are heading toward disaster. The book is based on real murders that happened on the island Smuttynose, though the contemporary story is fictional. Actually, the historical story is fictional too since the crimes in the book happen in a way very different from the story that came out in court at the alleged killer’s trial. The book was given an ok film adaptation in 2004. It’s worth a look if you like the story, but it comes as no surprise that the book is better.

51h-9e-csql-_ac_us218_8. Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood– Like The Weight of Water, this is based on a real-life murder. In 1843, Thomas Kinnear and his housekeeper Nancy Montgomery were murdered in Upper Canada. Grace Marks, a maid in the household, and James McDermott, a stableman/handyman, were convicted of the murder. McDermott was hanged and Grace Marks was sentenced to life in prison. That much is historical fact. Atwood’s novel begins after Grace has been incarcerated for some time. A committee that believes in her innocence hopes to have her pardoned and released. Since Grace cannot remember the crimes, they hire Dr. Simon Jordan, a psychologist to evaluate her and determine her sanity. Dr. Jordan meets with Grace and listens as she tells him the story of her life, leading up to the day of the murders. We follow Grace’s story and at times we wonder about the truth of what Grace tells Dr. Jordan. She seems to make an effort to keep his interest. We’re left with a sense of ambiguity. How much of what Grace tells is the truth? If what she tells isn’t the truth, does that mean she’s lying? This was recently made into a netflix miniseries that was also pretty good.

61hyvemt7ol-_ac_us218_9. Possession by AS Byatt– In the 19th century, poet Randolph Henry Ash, known for being a devoted husband, had an affair with his fellow poet Christabel LaMotte. At the end of the 20th century, scholar Roland Mitchell discovers evidence of the secret romance and begins to investigate. His quest leads him to LaMotte scholar, Dr. Maud Baily. The two become obsessed with finding out the truth about what happened between Ash and LaMotte, and their own romantic lives begin to become entwined with those of the poets. Both stories are told in parallel and come to echo one another in interesting ways. The book had a film adaptation that wasn’t bad on its own but made some fairly significant changes from the novel.

51ixaf4tmsl-_ac_us218_10. The Eight by Katherine Neville–  In 1790, Mireille, a novice nun at Montglane Abbey is tasked with helping her cousin, Valentine, disperse the pieces of a chess set in order to keep them from falling into the wrong hands. The set was a gift from the Moors to Emperor Charlemagne, and now it’s sought by power-hungry men and women including Napoleon, Robespierre, and Catherine the Great. In 1972 computer expert Cat Velis is sent to Algeria on a special assignment. Before she leaves, she is asked by an antique dealer to find the Montglaine Service, the same chess set that Mireille had tried to protect. It’s rumored to be in Algeria. As Cat tracks down the chess set and learns its history, she discovers the power that it contains.  The author wrote a sequel in 2008 called The Fire but I haven’t read it yet.

51timps1ytl-_ac_us218_11. The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor- Yes I know it’s supposed to be ten but I had trouble deciding between a couple, and I ended up just including an extra book. This is also based on a real incident. In 1917, England was still in the grips of the most devastating war that it had ever seen. Frances Griffiths and Elsie Wright, two cousins in Yorkshire, announced that they’ve photographed fairies in their garden. They release the photographs and become a national sensation. A country torn apart by war seems to have found the magic it desperately needs. Eventually, though, Frances and Elsie feel that they must tell the truth about the pictures. In 2017, Olivia Kavanagh inherits her grandfather’s bookshop and discovers an old manuscript. She becomes immersed in the story it tells, that ties past to present. But when she discovers a photo, she learns that reality and fantasy may be intertwined as well.