Top Ten Tuesday: Bookish Pet Peeves

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

October 5: Bookish Pet Peeves
I feel like I did a list like this a long time ago, but I can’t find it. So this might have some duplicates. Get ready for some complaining:

image credit: bookstr

Movie Tie-In covers – Even if I like the movie poster. Even if I like the movie. Just don’t.

When books by the same author/in the same series are different sizes – I want them on my shelves together and they should look like they go together!

When the synopsis (or any relevant information for that matter) is covered by a sticker – You can put the sticker anywhere else on the cover. Why put it where I’m trying to read?

When an author uses the same phrase/description many times -The book that comes to mind as an example of this is The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue. I liked the book, but the author compared the freckles on the main character’s face to a constellation, at least once a chapter.

When multiple characters have the same/similar names – Yes it can serve a purpose (interesting article about that here) but it can also get very confusing unless it’s done skillfully. Authors can be eager to do it, but forget to give readers other indicators that they’re reading about one character and not another.

Book covers that give the reader the wrong idea– One example that jumps to mind is author Marian Keyes’ work. Yes, there’s some humor in all her books, but Rachel’s Holiday is about addiction and recovery. The cover makes it look like it’s about a girl who has fun on vacation. The cover of This Charming Man (a book about abusive relationships) makes it look like a contemporary romance. I don’t know who designs her covers, but if I were her, I’d have some words with them about it.

The fact that “Women’s Fiction” is a genre – Men can read books about female characters and experiences. Some may choose not to, but why alienate them by marketing a book specifically to women? How about marketing books to anyone who may want to read them? Reading about people who aren’t exactly like us in every single way is how we develop empathy. The world needs more of that IMO.

When books in a series end with cliffhangers – I’m fine with chapters ending with cliffhangers. But when it’s the end of a book, even if there’s another installment in the series, give me some sense of closure. Yes you can introduce new storylines and give an idea what the next book will be about, but don’t make me think that I’m missing pages in my copy! An example would be Diana Gabaldon’s 7th Outlander book, An Echo in the Bone. The 6th book in the series tied up a lot of ongoing storylines toward the end, and pointed the characters in a new direction. That made a lot of readers think that it was the conclusion of the series. To avoid similar mistakes with the next book, the author ended it with about 5 unresolved storylines. It literally ends mid-conversation between two main characters, when one character has just told the other something shocking and important. In another storyline a kid has been kidnapped and left in a tunnel. Sure, in the next book we learn what happens to these characters, but the next book came out 5 years later! If I hear a book in a series I’m reading does something like this, I wait until the next one comes out (with hopefully some kind of closure at the end) before I read it.

image credit: seattle.bibliocommons.com

The fact that genre fiction is considered less “literature” than literary fiction is. There are incredibly talented. innovative authors, who take risks, push the boundaries of form and language across the genres. Someone who does those things in a romance or a mystery shouldn’t be regarded any differently than revered authors of literary fiction.

image credit: elle.com

-The fact that children’s literature is dismissed by most people who aren’t children. Children’s literature is more rich and complex than people tend to give it credit for. Yes, there are some silly books, and some books that are very much geared to an audience under the age of ten, say. But there are also some amazing stories that I’ve gotten more out of as an adult. In some cases, things flew right over my head as a kid, and when I reread it, I sort of nodded in understanding.

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Top Ten Tuesday: Anti-Travel Books

For That Artsy Reader Girl‘s Top Ten Tuesday, this week’s topic was

June 12: Books That Awaken the Travel Bug In Me

But then I started thinking that books that make me want to stay home might also be kind of fun…

51vkfhy5xal-_ac_us218_1. Wedding Night by Sophie Kinsella

Location: Greek Resort

Problem: Lottie is disappointed when her boyfriend doesn’t propose. When her ex-shows up they impulsively decide to elope. After the ceremony, it’s a quick flight to Greece. But Lottie’s sister, Fliss, knows that this marriage is a terrible idea. She also knows the marriage can be easily annulled if it’s not consummated, so she’s on a mission to keep that from happening, getting everyone from the groom’s best friend, to the hotel staff to help her.

41unjbdr4ql-_ac_us218_2. The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith

Location: Italy

Problem: Tom Ripley has been hired by a rich man to get his son Dickie to return to the US. Tom meets up with Dickie and some of his friends in Italy. But instead of getting Dickie to go home, he ends up killing Dickie and assuming his identity.

41yn-xblul-_ac_us218_3. Don’t Look Now by Daphne Du Maurier

Location: Venice, Italy

Problem- A young couple is vacationing in Venice while trying to recover from the loss of their daughter. They meet two women who claim to be psychic, and the women give a warning and tell them that their daughter’s spirit is with them. At the same time, a serial killer is stalking the city’s streets and canals…

51zbak-airl-_ac_us218_4. The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware

Location: Scandinavian luxury cruise

Problem: Lo is a travel writer, assigned to cover the maiden voyage of a new cruise line.  Her first night on board, she hears a scream and a splash. Looking out her window she sees something in the water. However, the ship’s officials don’t believe that anything really happened. Lo had been drinking that night, and no passengers are missing.

51mny8nb9il-_ac_us218_5. The Ruins by Scott Smith

Location: Cancun, Mexico

Problem: Four friends are on a beach vacation. When the brother of one of them disappears they decide to look for him where he was last seen, checking out some ancient ruins in the jungle. When they reach the ruins, the locals don’t seem to want to let them go, and once they do make it, they’re not allowed to leave, because an ancient enemy lives in the ruins.

51q4ceca-kl-_ac_us218_6. On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan

Location: Dorset coast, England

Problem: In 1962, Florence and Edward have just gotten married, and are on their honeymoon. But one of them has a secret that may tear them apart.

 

41thlz3l7dl-_ac_us218_7. Rachel’s Holiday by Marian Keyes

Location: Ireland

Problem: Rachael is an Irish ex-pat living in NYC. But when her tendency to overdo things lands her in the emergency room, her family whisks her back to Ireland and sends her to the Cloisters, a rehab. Rachel thinks it might be kind of nice: a little vacation, some spa treatments, maybe a celebrity roommate… What she finds are a lot of group therapy and some unwelcome self-knowledge.

51c7vwzpjhl-_ac_us218_8. Sleeping Arrangements by Madeline Wickam (aka Sophie Kinsella)

Location: Spain

Problem: Hugh feels alienated from his wife and kids. He hopes that a trip to a friend’s luxury villa in Spain will help the family reconnect. Meanwhile, Chloe and her family are facing similar problems and their friend offers them the same solution. But it turns out that their friend booked both families in the villa for the same week. And Chloe and Hugh have a history, and before the week is out old ghosts will be put to rest, new tensions will erupt, and the families may or may not make it out intact.

51ohnm-86zl-_ac_us218_9. The Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles

Location: North Africa

Problem: Port and Kit travel to Africa believing that it’s one of the last “unspoiled” places in the world. They’re soon joined by several annoying, parasitic travelers. To escape they head into the Sahara without plans or directions. It does not go well.

51yxivihhl-_ac_us218_10. The Magus by John Fowles

Location: Greek Island

Problem: Nicholas Urfe is a recent grad who has accepted a job teaching on a Greek island. He befriends the owner of an estate on the island, who plays elaborate mind games with him until he can’t tell what is and isn’t real.