#WyrdandWonder Book Bingo

I participated in Wyrd & Wonder‘s book bingo this month as part of their month long challenge. Take a look:

Here are the rules:

  • Grab the bingo card (yell if you want a blank one) and comment to let me know you’re taking part
  • Read fantasy books! Hopefully some of them match some of the prompts
  • Each read may only be used for a single prompt
  • Novellas count (for any prompt)
  • The read-along prompt can only be completed by The Bone Shard Daughter by Andrea Stewart
  • Post your completed* bingo card on your blog or any social media channel at the end of the month and tag me so I can see how you got on and include you in the draw
  • Completed bingo cards must be posted by end of day on June 1st
  • Winner will be picked on June 2nd

completed in the sense of showing what prompts you managed to read / what books you read

IMAGE CREDIT: pegasus images by Svetlana Alyuk on 123RF.com

I got a diagonal bingo from the top left corner down to the bottom right:

Unreliable Allies– In Genevieve Cogman’s The Invisible Library, Irene is a sort of interdimensional Librarian (yes, with a capital “L”) who must collect important works of fiction from different realities. On her newest mission she must work with Kai, a trainee Librarian who may be hiding something from her. Some other allies both from the Library and the world where she’s looking for the book, turn up, and they may all have their own agenda.

Reluctant Hero(ine)– In VE Schwab’s The Invisible life of Addie LaRue, Addie makes a bargain early on with a mysterious spirit. She gets eternal life, but she’s be immediately forgotten by everyone she meets once she’s out of sight. Addie spends a lot of time regretting that choice, but her only way out is to lose her soul.

Freebie Another book I read this month that doesn’t fit any prompts for this bingo is A Thousand Beginnings and Endings edited by Ellen Oh and Elsie Chapman. It’s a collection of retellings of Asian myths, legends, fairy tales, and folklore.

Finish A Series- I finished CL Wilson’s Tarien Soul series, reading the final book, Crown of Crystal Flame this month. Overall I enjoyed the series, but I felt that it was a bit too long at 5 books. I think the story could have been told as a trilogy.

Chosen One- Diana in Shadow of Night counts as a chosen one, I think. In the first book in the All Souls series she knows she a witch but has no connection to her power. In this one she starts to learn about the nature of her magic and her family history. She turns out to be a “weaver,” a kind of ultra-rare witch who can make new spells. She’s also a timewalker, who can travel through time. Her marriage to a vampire is practically unprecedented in the supernatural community (different kinds of creatures aren’t supposed to be closely involved) and there are some prophesies about her offspring, and potentially her ability to save supernatural creatures from extinction.

#WyrdandWonder Challenge (Part III)

My next set of prompts for May’s Wyrd and Wonder Challenge

May 20Fantasy creature on the cover

(bonus points if it isn’t a dragon)

Well, the most recent fantasy book I read with fantasy creature on the cover, was Crown of Crystal Flame, by CL Wilson. It’s the final book in Wilson’s Tarien Soul series and it has a Tarien (sort of like a giant cat with wings) on the cover in the background. The first book in the series, Lord of the Fading Lands shows a Tarien a bit more clearly.
May 21Fantasy in translation

Fridays are all about celebrating fantasy from around the world – this week focuses on books that weren’t originally written in English

The one that leaps immediately to mind is The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, because it’s a favorite (well really the whole Cemetery of Forgotten Books series counts) The fantasy elements are stronger elsewhere in the series, but as I said, this one is my favorite, and it has those elements as well, to a lesser extent. It was originally written in Spanish.
Another book that, well, let’s say it made a strong impression on me was Troll: A Love Story by Finnish author Johanna Sinisalo.
Actually I’m a big fan of magical realism, which I suppose is a subgenre of fantasy. It has strong associations with Latin America, so a lot of the books are in translation from Spanish. Some favorites are Like Water For Chocolate, Eva Luna, and The House of the Spirits.
I suppose many classic fairy tale collections count as well. The Brother’s Grimm and ETA Hoffman were originally in German. Hans Christian Anderson was Danish. Charles Perrault was French. They all originally wrote in their native languages.
May 22Get in the sea

Seaborne fantasy, mermaid tales, the lady in the lake – make it watery for World Maritime Day
…or if you’re feeling bitter, what fantasy would you consign to the depths and why?


I really enjoyed Carolyn Turgen’s Mermaid. It’s based on Hans Christian Anderson’s The Little Mermaid (which is very different from Disney’s version!) and follows the point of view of both the mermaid and the princess who the mermaid’s beloved marries.
May 23Book rainbow

book spines arranged in the colours of the rainbow

Some of the colors didn’t photograph as well as I would have liked, but I didn’t have a chance to play with the lighting.
May 24On the shelf

how long has that been on your shelf / TBR?? a book / books you really should have read by now

I think these have been on my shelf for the longest:
White As Snow by Tanith Lee
To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis
The Blue Girl by Charles DeLint

Hopefully I can get to them soon!
May 25Chosen one #TropeTuesday

Double-edged prophecies, irresistible destiny, a plot stick you just can’t dodge – let’s end the month on a classic

Well, this month these are the books I’ve read that use that trope:
Crown of Crystal Flame by CL Wilson– This is the final book in the Tarien Soul series and the heroine, Elysetta, has every characteristic of a “chosen one.” She has a mysterious past, she was found in the woods as a baby, she has a supernatural/fantastic origin story, and she is destined to either save, or destroy, the fey.
Shadow of Night by Deborah Harkness-This is the second book in the All Souls series and I think that Diana has some “chosen one” characteristics too. She knows she’s a witch but she didn’t have any sense of connection to her heritage before the first book in the series. In this book, she starts her magic training, and it turns out she’s a “weaver,” a rare kind of witch that can make up spells. It’s been hinted that she might save supernatural creatures from extinction. She’s also married to a vampire, and there are prophesies about their offspring.
May 26All the feels

We all love an emotional rollercoaster – a book that gave your feelings a full on work out

I’m often an emotional wreck as I read, so this might be a long-ish list with major spoilers. Be warned…

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman- The end when Bod leaves the graveyard, and the ghosts who raised him, and goes out to pursue his future as a living person.
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro– I’m counting this as a fantasy, even though you could make the argument for it being sci-fi. Really just the whole thing once we learned what the characters were and their inevitable fate.
Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon- A lot of books in the Outlander series have given me all the feels on a semi regular basis, but this one totally destroyed me when Jamie sends Claire back through the stones, to the future (they both think forever), and goes off to die (they think) at the battle of Culloden…
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by JK Rowling– This was another series where I got emotional at many different points (the end of The Prisoner of Azkaban, the end of The Goblet of Fire, the end of The Half Blood Prince…) but if I had to pick one part of the series, it would be this book. When people we love die in battle, when Harry goes into the forest, Dobby, Snape, and really everything!
The Keeping Place by Isobelle Carmody- Once again, the Obernewtyn series has given me all the feels at several points. But this one features the Misfits getting betrayed by people they thought were allies. Many important and beloved characters are murdered in an ambush I didn’t see coming. My friend, who recommended the series warned me that we’d lose some people in this one, so I was semi-prepared, but the scope and depth of the betrayal was what destroyed me.

#WyrdandWonder Challenge Catch Up

I’m trying to do this year’s Wyrd and Wonder Challenge celebrating the fantasy genre. Since I can’t do a prompt a day (I keep forgetting) I’ll try to do them once a week or so.

So here we go:

DayPrompt
May 1We’re going on an adventure

what will you be reading this Wyrd and Wonder? (in theory. Until we tempt you with other recommendations)

For the first week in May I read Shadow of Night (second in the All Souls Trilogy) by Deborah Harkness
Now I’m reading The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
On my immediate TBR (as in, these are sitting on my shelf)
Crown of Crystal Flame by CL Wilson (last in the Tarien Soul series)
White As Snow by Tanith Lee
To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis (I think this counts as fantasy, since time travel isn’t real)
The Blue Girl by Charles DeLint
The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by VE Schwab
The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness

we’ll see how many I actually get through!
May 2Pop this in your book bag of holding

What one fantasy book have you read since last Wyrd and Wonder that you want to put on the rest of the party’s radar?

Well since I’ve never participated in Wyrd and Wonder before, this should be pretty easy. It’s not though: so. many. choices! I did recently really enjoy Neverworld Wake by Marisha Pessl. It’s set in a sort of limbo between life and death, where the main character, Beatrice, and her friends have to relive the day of their death over and over until they can vote on who will be the only survivor of the group.
May 3#MapMonday

I’m sharing the map of Florin and Guilder in The Princess Bride by William Goldman. Why? Because, even through I prefer the film, I think the book is sometimes unfairly overshadowed by it.


May 4I never knew my father #TropeTuesday

This year, Tuesdays are all about fantasy tropes we love (to hate) #TropeTuesday
In honour of Star Wars Day (May the Fourth Be With You) we’ll kick off with orphans, foundlings and other secret heirs to the throne / a grand inheritance / the magic in their blood


I’m going with the Tarien Soul series for this one, since the final book is on my TBR for the month. The heroine, Elysetta, has a loving adoptive father, but she’s never met her biological father, so I’m counting it. The reader knows who her biological family is, and what happened to them, but so far in the series, Elysetta hasn’t met them. I expect that will (or, at least, it may) change in the conclusion.
May 5I can do this all day

Underdogs or victory (in battle) against the odds (in honour of Cinco de Mayo)

In Ashling, the third book in Isobelle Carmody’s Obernewtyn series, there is going to be a rebellion against the totalitarian Council. The Misfits of Obernewtyn can help the rebels with their unique powers and abilities. But in order to do so, they must first convince the rebels to overcome their prejudice against Misfits, and accept their help. To do so, they participate in a sort of test of their abilities, called BattleGames.
May 6Fly my pretties

A book featuring any flying animal character or on the cover is fair game today, but bonus points if it’s a pegasus (our 2021 Wyrd and Wonder mythical mascot)

Does this have to book a book I’ve read? If not, I’ll go with Pegasus by Robin McKinley (which is on my TBR)
May 7Fantasy from around the world

Fridays are all about celebrating fantasy from around the world – this week focuses on fantasy settings inspired by non-European cultures

Most recently, I really enjoyed Gods of Jade and Shadow, which was set in Mexico and played with some Mayan mythology. I read Akata Witch and Akata Warrior fairly recently too, and those are an interesting look at some west African magic.
May 8Currently reading

The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
May 9Spine poetry OR Mother’s Day

spine poetry (combine book titles into a poem)
or celebrate fantasy mums (mother figures, female mentors etc) for international Mother’s Day


For this one, I’ll give a shout out to October Daye (of the October Daye series by Seanan McGuire) who is mother to a daughter she hasn’t seen in years. The absence wasn’t her fault. She’d been turned into a fish. But her daughter doesn’t know that.
May 10Mixed feelings

Maybe it didn’t meet your expectations, maybe you loved some bits but not others, maybe it made you both incredibly happy and very sad… but tell us why!

I found Mary Robinette Kowel’s Glamourist Histories good enough that I wished they were better. They’re regency romance a la Jane Austen, but with fantasy thrown in. The main characters are Glamourists who work with a sort of art form known as glamour. This takes a physical toll on the worker, but it was very hard to understand how glamour actually worked. So the parts that dealt with that weren’t clear, and it felt like it was a big part of the series that I wasn’t completely getting. But I enjoyed it in spite of that issue.
May 11Reluctant hero(ine) #TropeTuesday

Since I’m currently in the middle of the All Souls series (read the first two books, and am currently watching season 2 of the show) I’ll go with this one. In the first book, A Discovery of Witches, the heroine, Diana, is pulled into a struggle between creatures (witches, vampires and daemons). She knows she’s a witch, but she’s not happy about it, and keeps distance from her magical heritage. Except in this book she realizes she can’t do that anymore.