Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Read Based on Their Covers

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

September 15: Cover Freebie (choose your own topic, centered on book covers or cover art)

We all know we’re not supposed to judge them that way, but every once in a while you see a book cover that’s so pretty that it’s just love at first sight. Sometimes it’s not pretty but something about it grabs your attention and you need to know more. You know you need to read this book. So here are some book covers that put their books straight on my TBR. Some of the books lived up to the cover hype, some didn’t. But something about these covers drew me in.

  1. Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss – This one has the advantage of looking like a wild celebration of nature, while at the same time looking like a skull. It’s beautiful and sinister at the same time. As it turns out, that serves the content of the book well.

2. Educated by Tara Westover– This is another book cover that’s sort of two things at once. First I saw a pencil, and I just thought it was a book about education, with a pencil on the cover. Kind of boring. But when I looked closer, I saw it was also a silhouette of a person against the backdrop of a mountain, and I became more intrigued. Is it a pencil or a mountain? And which is more of an important instrument in the author’s education? It’s up to the reader to decide. The fact that the ground (or paint on the pencil, depending how you see it) is also red. I think that you can read into that too. Red of course suggests blood. Which could mean family, or spilled blood. Again both might be appropriate.

3. Thorn Jack by Katherine Harbour- The current cover of this book looks a bit different, but I love the colors of this one. The green and black evoke the natural world at night and the gold lettering and edges suggest something artificial as well. The nettles look like they’re warning you off and yet the leaves feel like it’s drawing you in. And what about the girl? Is she sleeping? dead? comatose? I also like that the shape of this book is different from most (it’s a perfect square) which makes it stand out a bit.

4. Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs– When I first saw this cover I couldn’t figure out why the little girl was so eerie. Was it because she was brighter than the black and white background? Then I realized that she was floating! But even that doesn’t really explain why I find this cover unsettling. But it did intrigue me!

5. A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray– I could see how someone might look at this book cover and think they were getting a bodice ripper. But for some reason that wasn’t what I thought of when I saw it. Instead I thought “that girl looks like she’s realizing her corset is too tight” which as it turns out, is a metaphor for a theme in the book. I wasn’t into reading fantasy when I read this book, so I’m glad they didn’t go that direction with the cover. It might have put me off, but this book pulled me back into the genre after some time away.

6. Flowers in the Attic by VC Andrews– The audiobook edition is the only one I could find that still has this cover. The current cover is a bit different. I think I was about 11 or 12 when I saw this cover, and knew that I had to read the book to find out who the girl was and why she was trapped in what looked like a dollhouse. To make matters even more intriguing, it was a peephole cover. When you opened it, you saw this image. So I had to read the book to find out what that was about! It probably wasn’t a remotely appropriate book for a kid that age, but the cover sure made it look intriguing!

7. Twilight by Stephanie Meyer- Whatever your opinion of sparkly vampires, I think credit goes to the designer who created a really alluring cover. The pale hands against the black background make a great contrast. The apple offered has suggestions of forbidden fruit and loss of innocence. The red against the white and the black also draws you in suggesting blood. It’s natural to see it and think “I want to know what that’s about!”

8. The Luxe series by Anna Godbersen– Sometimes I’m just a sucker for a pretty dress. This quartet features some very pretty dresses on the covers. Check them out (is it cheating to include all 4 in one space on my list?) Actually they’ve changed the covers since these came out, which is kind of a shame IMO. These books were total guilty pleasures, and the dresses on the covers sort of played into that. I’d like to think I’m above such shallow lures, but really, I’m not.

9. Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson– I love that this cover sort of fools you. You don’t quite trust your eyes. You think you’re seeing a man and a women locked in a passionate embrace. But then you realize that you’re seeing hats and coats on a coat rack! Oddly I didn’t find that disappointing though, I appreciated the trick. It showed a sort of humor on the designer’s part, and I wanted to see if that humor was continued through the book.

10. The Blue Rose by Kate Forsyth– This may be a cheat because I may have read the book even if it had a different cover, because I like the author. But this cover also really drew me in. I think one reason is that blue is my favorite color, and the cover has a lot of it! But also because blue roses are something you don’t see every day. The title refers to a Chinese fairy tale about a man searching for a blue rose for his beloved.

Honorable mention- Persephone ClassicsPersephone Books is a London based bookshop and publisher that reprints neglected works by mid twentieth century writers (mostly female). Most of their books have a plain grey cover. However, they have reissued twelve best sellers with colorful art. The drawback to these is that they don’t have the full color end papers that other Persephone titles have, but the cover art is pretty enough to draw my in on it’s own!

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Top Ten Tuesday: Books In Need of a Sequel

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

March 12: Standalone Books That Need a Sequel

For the record I think some of these were intended to have a sequel which, for whatever reason, didn’t work out. They’re not all standalones though. Sometimes they are a sequel to something else and another sequel is needed. Just a warning, I tried to avoid SPOILERS but there might be  some minor ones here and there.

51islkdgaql-_ac_us218_1. The River of No Return by Bee Ridgeway– I think the author definitely intended to write a sequel to this book. The ending sets it up and leaves us with a cliffhanger. But  it came out in  2013 and there’s still no word of a sequel, so it’s not looking promising…

51polcsfrl-_ac_us218_2. Forever Amber by Kathleen Winsor–  Like Gone With the Wind (a book it recalls in several ways), this leaves the characters in a transitional place. What will they do next? Gone With the Wind had an authorized sequel (not a very good one, but it existed…) whereas this doesn’t even have that much.

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3. Love Me by Rachel Shukert– This is the sequel to Shukert’s Starstruck. She was clearly intending this series to be a trilogy at least, but no more books in the series came. I tweeted her once and asked her about it. She said that there were no current plans for anything more in the series.

41xfknijvel-_ac_us218_4. Villette by Charlotte Bronte– I’m going to try not to give away spoilers here, but come on! Did he make it? Didn’t he? If so (or if not!) what happened next! The first time I read it, I actually thought that my copy had pages missing! But I think Charlotte Bronte was pretty daring to end the book this way.

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5. Splendor by Anna Godbersen– Really I just wanted this series to end a bit differently. There were things I liked about it a lot, and things that few really random, contrived, and, in  a few cases, out of character. I’d just like to see some of the loose ends that the book tried to tie up, explored.

51mh-wvb8l._ac_ul436_6. Almost Paradise by Susan Isaacs- This ended with one of the characters in a difficult, devastated position. How does he respond? What does he do next? I  understand why it ended where it did. The story this book was telling was over but I think there’s more more the characters.

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7. Cybele’s Secret by Juliet Marillier– This was the sequel to Marillier’s Wildwood Dancing. It was a pretty good read but according to Marillier her publishing company didn’t want to ask for a third because the sales of this one weren’t that great.

51xk9vlpl-l._ac_ul436_8. The Stolen Child by Keith Donohue– This had a fairly open ending with the main character about to embark on a quest. It’s a valid choice to end that way, but I want to know what happened next! Did he succeed?

51-eyayn0ol-_ac_us218_9. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern– I’m sort of torn because while the ending left the door open for a sequel, I felt like this did have a sense of completion in spite of that. But the setting is so vivid and colorful that I think you could easily tell a few more stories about it.

51j8xsssd0l-_ac_us218_10. The Crimson Petal and the White by Michel Faber– This book ends with the anti-heroine doing a bad thing that could potentially have good results. Or it could have really bad results! I’d like to know which!