Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Settings

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

I decided to make this one a list of past lists

Schools

Hotels/Inns/B&Bs

Islands

At sea/near the sea

Carnivals/circuses/amusement parks

Victoria era

New York City

Small town

Bookshops/Libraries

Haunted houses, cemeteries, and spooky places

#WyrdandWonder Book Bingo

I participated in Wyrd & Wonder‘s book bingo this month as part of their month long challenge. Take a look:

Here are the rules:

  • Grab the bingo card (yell if you want a blank one) and comment to let me know you’re taking part
  • Read fantasy books! Hopefully some of them match some of the prompts
  • Each read may only be used for a single prompt
  • Novellas count (for any prompt)
  • The read-along prompt can only be completed by The Bone Shard Daughter by Andrea Stewart
  • Post your completed* bingo card on your blog or any social media channel at the end of the month and tag me so I can see how you got on and include you in the draw
  • Completed bingo cards must be posted by end of day on June 1st
  • Winner will be picked on June 2nd

completed in the sense of showing what prompts you managed to read / what books you read

IMAGE CREDIT: pegasus images by Svetlana Alyuk on 123RF.com

I got a diagonal bingo from the top left corner down to the bottom right:

Unreliable Allies– In Genevieve Cogman’s The Invisible Library, Irene is a sort of interdimensional Librarian (yes, with a capital “L”) who must collect important works of fiction from different realities. On her newest mission she must work with Kai, a trainee Librarian who may be hiding something from her. Some other allies both from the Library and the world where she’s looking for the book, turn up, and they may all have their own agenda.

Reluctant Hero(ine)– In VE Schwab’s The Invisible life of Addie LaRue, Addie makes a bargain early on with a mysterious spirit. She gets eternal life, but she’s be immediately forgotten by everyone she meets once she’s out of sight. Addie spends a lot of time regretting that choice, but her only way out is to lose her soul.

Freebie Another book I read this month that doesn’t fit any prompts for this bingo is A Thousand Beginnings and Endings edited by Ellen Oh and Elsie Chapman. It’s a collection of retellings of Asian myths, legends, fairy tales, and folklore.

Finish A Series- I finished CL Wilson’s Tarien Soul series, reading the final book, Crown of Crystal Flame this month. Overall I enjoyed the series, but I felt that it was a bit too long at 5 books. I think the story could have been told as a trilogy.

Chosen One- Diana in Shadow of Night counts as a chosen one, I think. In the first book in the All Souls series she knows she a witch but has no connection to her power. In this one she starts to learn about the nature of her magic and her family history. She turns out to be a “weaver,” a kind of ultra-rare witch who can make new spells. She’s also a timewalker, who can travel through time. Her marriage to a vampire is practically unprecedented in the supernatural community (different kinds of creatures aren’t supposed to be closely involved) and there are some prophesies about her offspring, and potentially her ability to save supernatural creatures from extinction.

#WyrdandWonder Challenge (Part III)

My next set of prompts for May’s Wyrd and Wonder Challenge

May 20Fantasy creature on the cover

(bonus points if it isn’t a dragon)

Well, the most recent fantasy book I read with fantasy creature on the cover, was Crown of Crystal Flame, by CL Wilson. It’s the final book in Wilson’s Tarien Soul series and it has a Tarien (sort of like a giant cat with wings) on the cover in the background. The first book in the series, Lord of the Fading Lands shows a Tarien a bit more clearly.
May 21Fantasy in translation

Fridays are all about celebrating fantasy from around the world – this week focuses on books that weren’t originally written in English

The one that leaps immediately to mind is The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, because it’s a favorite (well really the whole Cemetery of Forgotten Books series counts) The fantasy elements are stronger elsewhere in the series, but as I said, this one is my favorite, and it has those elements as well, to a lesser extent. It was originally written in Spanish.
Another book that, well, let’s say it made a strong impression on me was Troll: A Love Story by Finnish author Johanna Sinisalo.
Actually I’m a big fan of magical realism, which I suppose is a subgenre of fantasy. It has strong associations with Latin America, so a lot of the books are in translation from Spanish. Some favorites are Like Water For Chocolate, Eva Luna, and The House of the Spirits.
I suppose many classic fairy tale collections count as well. The Brother’s Grimm and ETA Hoffman were originally in German. Hans Christian Anderson was Danish. Charles Perrault was French. They all originally wrote in their native languages.
May 22Get in the sea

Seaborne fantasy, mermaid tales, the lady in the lake – make it watery for World Maritime Day
…or if you’re feeling bitter, what fantasy would you consign to the depths and why?


I really enjoyed Carolyn Turgen’s Mermaid. It’s based on Hans Christian Anderson’s The Little Mermaid (which is very different from Disney’s version!) and follows the point of view of both the mermaid and the princess who the mermaid’s beloved marries.
May 23Book rainbow

book spines arranged in the colours of the rainbow

Some of the colors didn’t photograph as well as I would have liked, but I didn’t have a chance to play with the lighting.
May 24On the shelf

how long has that been on your shelf / TBR?? a book / books you really should have read by now

I think these have been on my shelf for the longest:
White As Snow by Tanith Lee
To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis
The Blue Girl by Charles DeLint

Hopefully I can get to them soon!
May 25Chosen one #TropeTuesday

Double-edged prophecies, irresistible destiny, a plot stick you just can’t dodge – let’s end the month on a classic

Well, this month these are the books I’ve read that use that trope:
Crown of Crystal Flame by CL Wilson– This is the final book in the Tarien Soul series and the heroine, Elysetta, has every characteristic of a “chosen one.” She has a mysterious past, she was found in the woods as a baby, she has a supernatural/fantastic origin story, and she is destined to either save, or destroy, the fey.
Shadow of Night by Deborah Harkness-This is the second book in the All Souls series and I think that Diana has some “chosen one” characteristics too. She knows she’s a witch but she didn’t have any sense of connection to her heritage before the first book in the series. In this book, she starts her magic training, and it turns out she’s a “weaver,” a rare kind of witch that can make up spells. It’s been hinted that she might save supernatural creatures from extinction. She’s also married to a vampire, and there are prophesies about their offspring.
May 26All the feels

We all love an emotional rollercoaster – a book that gave your feelings a full on work out

I’m often an emotional wreck as I read, so this might be a long-ish list with major spoilers. Be warned…

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman- The end when Bod leaves the graveyard, and the ghosts who raised him, and goes out to pursue his future as a living person.
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro– I’m counting this as a fantasy, even though you could make the argument for it being sci-fi. Really just the whole thing once we learned what the characters were and their inevitable fate.
Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon- A lot of books in the Outlander series have given me all the feels on a semi regular basis, but this one totally destroyed me when Jamie sends Claire back through the stones, to the future (they both think forever), and goes off to die (they think) at the battle of Culloden…
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by JK Rowling– This was another series where I got emotional at many different points (the end of The Prisoner of Azkaban, the end of The Goblet of Fire, the end of The Half Blood Prince…) but if I had to pick one part of the series, it would be this book. When people we love die in battle, when Harry goes into the forest, Dobby, Snape, and really everything!
The Keeping Place by Isobelle Carmody- Once again, the Obernewtyn series has given me all the feels at several points. But this one features the Misfits getting betrayed by people they thought were allies. Many important and beloved characters are murdered in an ambush I didn’t see coming. My friend, who recommended the series warned me that we’d lose some people in this one, so I was semi-prepared, but the scope and depth of the betrayal was what destroyed me.

#WyrdAndWonder Challenge Catch up (Part II)

For Wyrd & Wonder’s Challenge

May 12Desert island reads

Eight (audio)books, one movie franchise or TV show and a luxury item – what are you taking? (fantasy choices only this month please!)

See my answers here
May 13Had me at hello

Amazing cover art or a perfect pitch – a book you wanted to read before you even saw the synopsis (or where you immediately NEEDED to read the synopsis because your interest had been piqued)

Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley- The pitch describes it as ” is described as “Jamaica Inn by way of Jeff Vandermeer, Ursula Le Guin, Angela Carter and Michel Faber.” I haven’t’ read it yet (it only came out earlier this year) but I really need to read this like, yesterday!
May 14Fantasy voices from around the world

Fridays are all about celebrating fantasy from around the world – this week focuses on the authors rather than the setting (non US / UK born; bonus points for also non US / UK resident)

Recently someone in my book club read The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna. She had a mixed reaction to it, but some of what she said made me think it might be an interesting read, regardless. Forna was born in Sierra Leone. She moved to the US as a child due to political instability.
May 15#StackSaturday

A few of my upcoming reads
May 16Page to screen

What dramatization of a fantasy read have you loved (movie, tv, play, radio – anything goes) – and/or what would you really like to see get made?

One of my favorite fantasy adaptations is Stardust, based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. This is one of the few cases where I actually like the movie better than the book.

I’d love to see a film/tv adaptation of Katherine Neville’s The Eight. I’d call it “light” fantasy in that it encompasses several other genres just as much/more than fantasy, but since it does include some fantasy (can’t say more than that without spoilers!) I’m counting it.
May 17Can’t wait to read

on your TBR or up and coming releases

On my immediate(ish) TBR
White As Snow by Tanith Lee
To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis
The Blue Girl by Charles DeLint
The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by VE Schwab
The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness
Skyward Inn by Aliya Whiteley
The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna
Harp of Kings by Juliet Marillier

Upcoming releases (there are millions, so I limited it to the next 2 months)
The Wolf and the Woodman by Ava Reid (publication June 8, 2021)
Honeycomb by Joanne M Harris (publication May 25, 2021)
The Hidden Palace (publication June 8, 2021)
The Nature of Witches (publication June 1, 2021)
For the Wolf by Hanna F. Whitten (publication June 1, 2021)
The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo
May 18With friends like these #TropeTuesday

Enemy to ally or otherwise unreliable / uncertain allies, backstabbing best friends… #TropeTuesday

Undead Girl Gang by Lily Anderson has some of both. When the heroine, Camila brings her BFF back from the dead, she’s hoping for the name of her friend’s killer and a chance to say goodbye. But she accidentally brings back two recently dead mean girls from her high school, as well. The girls have to work together to solve their murders, and become allies. Also Camila’s friend doesn’t always 100% appreciate being brought back,, so there’s some tension there.
May 19Who’s afraid of the suck fairy?

The suck fairy visits old favourites and removes their sparkle, leaving you wondering what Past You saw in this book when you reread it. Have you had a visit from the suck fairy / are there books you’re afraid to reread in case they’ve been visited by the suck fairy?

I’ve been wanting to reread Libba Bray’s Gemma Doyle series for a while. They have a special place in my heart, but I’m nervous about rereading due to fear of the “suck fairy.” But a friend of mine recently reread them and said they held up pretty well, so maybe I’ll brave it at some point soon.

Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Tropes

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

ttt-new

August 20: Favorite Tropes (a trope is a commonly used theme or plot device) (submitted by Andrea @ Books for Muse)

1. Mysterious school

2. Slow burn romance

3. Small towns

4. Missing/Absent parents

5. Family secrets

6. Gothic

7. Neo-Victorian

8. Time Travel / Time Slips

9. Dual Timelines

10. Fairy Tale retellings