Top Ten Tuesday: Books With Long Titles

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday

October 13: Super Long Book Titles

1. From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by EL Konigsburg – A childhood fave. Mrs. Basil E. has a long name in and of herself, but when you add those mixed up files, you get a really long title.

2. The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in A Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente– Most of the time I just refer to this one as “Fairyland” or “The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland” if I’m feeling particularly long winded. I never go for the full title!

3. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon- This one is meant to sound like the title of a Sherlock Holmes mystery, and I suppose it does.

4. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Schaffer and Annie Barrows– For some reason always use the full title when talking about this book.

5. If On A Winter’s Night A Traveler by Italo Calvino- This one I shorten to “If On A Winter’s Night.” We don’t need the traveler.

6. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman – I usually just call this one “Eleanor Oliphant” and leave her status out of it.

7. The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardscastle by Stuart Turton– This is another one where I just call it by the name of the character (in this case “Evelyn Hardcastle”) and leave out all the rest.

8. The Pirate Captain: Chronicles of A Legend: Nor Silver Kerry Lynne– The author of the book cleared up via twitter that this is the full tile of her first book. It’s a fun read, but I don’t think we need the double subtitle. Just one is fine!

9. Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg– This one I usually just call by the film adaptations’ title, Fried Green Tomatoes.

10. Written in My Own Heart’s Blood by Diana Gabaldon– The author called this one MOBY on social media. The logic was it’s big, it’s white. And when you say the initials “MOHB” it sounds like “MOBY.” As a result the fandom tends to call this one MOBY,

Top Ten Tuesday: Books That Gave Me a Book Hangover

For That Artsy Reader Girl’s Top Ten Tuesday:

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February 18: The Last Ten Books That Gave Me a Book Hangover (submitted by Deanna @ A Novel Glimpse)

For me book hangovers are rare. Even with a great book I’m aware that the next great book is on the horizon! The ones that give me hangovers aren’t always my favorites or even the best ones. But something about them sticks with me and makes it harder than usual to move on.  So I decided to just do ten books that left me with lingering effects instead of the last ten. So yes, I might miss one or two, but you’ll get an idea. I also wan’t 100% literal with the term “book hangover”: anything that linger afterward in a strong was qualified for the list.

81nembjjg8l._ac_uy218_ml3_1.Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by JK Rowling– This shouldn’t be a surprise. By the time I finished this one I felt like I’d been on a long journey, and left several old friends behind.

91tal5fv30l._ac_uy218_ml3_2. Written in My Own Heart’s Blood by Diana Gabaldon– It’s rare when one of my favorite entries in a series comes eight books in, but this one pulled it off, leaving me in a place where I felt emotionally exhausted but satisfied and then ending things with a beautiful reunion.

51omzinvtpl-_ac_us218_3. The Bronze Horseman by Paullina Simons- I think my response to this book was based largely on who I was and where I was (in terms of my life) at the time that I read it. I sobbed for like two hours when I finished this! But then I found out that there were two sequels, and while I enjoyed them to differing degrees I didn’t have the same emotional response. That makes me think that it was less about the book itself and more about something it touched off at the time.

51vp6vchi4l-_ac_us218_4.A Little Life by Hana Yanagihara– This left me with kind of a numbness. I felt like I’d be through so much with these characters, so how was I supposed to just pick up and move on with my own life?

418rxncl2rl-_ac_us218_5. House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski– In a way a book about an endless house that you many never leave seems tailor made to give you a book hangover. But in this case it wasn’t an immediate hangover but rather elements of the book randomly coming back to me at different points.

911-t2bi6l._ac_uy218_ml3_6.The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon– This book created a world that seemed so vivid with such twists and turns that I was surprised to finish it and realize that it was only a book.

41swp08eytl-_ac_us218_17. Fingersmith by Sarah Waters– Forget Gone Girl, this book had some twists that really threw me in terms of upending everything I thought I knew about the plot and characters. After I read it, I had several “what do you mean, that character is exactly who he claimed to be?!” experiences with books. I kept looking for the trick that wasn’t there!

 

41duzypmsll._ac_uy218_ml3_8. Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier – I loved Marillier’s world building in this series. I’d even go so far as to say that it (very indirectly!) inspired my own,  in Beautiful. But after I finished it was hard to get back to other books and worlds without holding them up to the same standard.

51vrv0hceml-_ac_us218_9. Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafasi– This book made me aware of how reading a novel can be a politically subversive act. That of course made me wonder about every book I read after it; “what deeply held ideas and institutions am I undermining by reading this book?”

41x7kokbrol-_ac_us218_10. The Secret History by Donna Tartt– After I read this I kept looking for read alikes. But after being burned by many books claiming to be a similar experience, I gave up on that quest.